Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 705–710 | Cite as

Substitution of thoracic oesophagus by interposition of a pedicled gastric tube, preserving LES function: clinical and histological follow-up

  • Antonio Dessanti
  • Vincenzo Di Benedetto
  • Marco Iannuccelli
  • Eraldo Sanna-Passino
  • Liliana Mura
  • Giuseppina Dessanti
  • Gian Mario Careddu
  • Maria Lucia Manunta
  • Paolo Cossu-Rocca
  • Ennio Sanna
Original article

Abstract

Assessment of clinical evolution and histological findings in a group of animals experimentally operated on to substitute the thoracic oesophagus with a gastric tube. Six piglets underwent oesophageal replacement with a gastric tube, constructed from the greater curvature of stomach and pedicled on the gastroepiploic vessels, which was interposed between the oesophageal stumps. At follow-up, all animals were found to be growing and eating normally, apart from case no 1 (stenosis of the lower oesophageal anastomosis). Ph-metry showed a neutral pH on the gastric tube. Postmortem histological analysis of the gastric tube and native oesophagus samples did not show any significant lesions, except in case no 1 (inflammation of the gastric tube and upper oesophagus due to food stasis). The technique of substitution of the oesophagus with an interposed pedicled gastric tube can be a breakthrough in existing surgical methods of oesophageal replacement.

Keywords

Oesophageal substitution Gastric tube interposition Oesophageal atresia Caustic oesophageal stenosis Experimental surgery. 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio Dessanti
    • 1
    • 7
  • Vincenzo Di Benedetto
    • 2
  • Marco Iannuccelli
    • 1
  • Eraldo Sanna-Passino
    • 3
  • Liliana Mura
    • 4
  • Giuseppina Dessanti
    • 4
  • Gian Mario Careddu
    • 3
  • Maria Lucia Manunta
    • 3
  • Paolo Cossu-Rocca
    • 5
  • Ennio Sanna
    • 6
  1. 1.Unit of Pediatric SurgeryUniversity of SassariSassariItaly
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric SurgeryUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  3. 3.Service of Surgery (Veterinary School)University of SassariSassariItaly
  4. 4.Institute of Anestesiology and Intensive Care UnitUniversity of SassariSassariItaly
  5. 5.Service of Pathology (Medical School)University of SassariSassariItaly
  6. 6.Institute of Pathology (Veterinary School)University of SassariSassariItaly
  7. 7.SassariItaly

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