Can summer monsoon moisture invade the Jade Pass in Northwestern China?

Abstract

Heavy precipitation events are increasingly concerned because their significant contribution to annual precipitation in the Northwestern China, which might be related to invasion of summer monsoon moisture. It is interest whether or not the same is Jade Pass as being outside the control of the Asian summer monsoon. In this work, six heavy precipitation events were selected based on the 95 percentiles of the daily precipitation at the 12 weather stations around the Jade Pass from 1970–2000, with consideration of the influences of elevation. The event on June 19th, 2013 was chosen for a detailed examination due to the fact that the day has a large-scale precipitation as revealed by a gridded precipitation dataset over a large region. Using a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulation with high spatiotemporal resolution and in situ isotopic tracing (δ18O, δD), under a large-scale heavy precipitation event, this study provides ambitious view at the synoptic scale. A dramatic decrease in the δ18O, δD and deuterium (d)-excess of precipitation, very high relative humidity (98%), and reduced air temperature indicate that the precipitation was a result of long-distance-transported monsoon vapor. In addition, the slope of the local water meteoric line (LWML) of the precipitation for this event was very close to that of the global meteoric water line (GWML), indicating the source of moisture was from the ocean. Meanwhile, the WRF simulation confirms that the precipitation at the Jade Pass was not caused by local convection, but by summer monsoon. Both WRF simulation and isotopic tracing support the view that the monsoon moisture could invade Jade Pass at the synoptic scale and impact on precipitation, which need be further investigated.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (QYZDY-SSW-DQC021, QYZDJ-SSW- DQC039), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41721091, 41630754), the State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science (SKLCS-ZZ-2020), Open funding from KLME and CIC-FEMD (KLME201901), and Key Laboratory of Land Surface Process and Climate Change in Cold and Arid Regions, Chinese Academy of Sciences (LPCC2019003).

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Correspondence to Shichang Kang or Zhenming Ji.

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Du, W., Kang, S., Qin, X. et al. Can summer monsoon moisture invade the Jade Pass in Northwestern China?. Clim Dyn 55, 3101–3115 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00382-020-05423-y

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Keywords

  • Extreme precipitation
  • Isotopic tracing (δ18O, δD)
  • WRF simulation
  • Monsoon moisture
  • Jade pass