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Indole acetic acid and ACC deaminase-producing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 promote rice growth, and in the process undergo colonization and chemotaxis

Abstract

This study focuses on the chemotaxis, colonization and rice growth promoting ability of indole acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-producing rhizobacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10, previously isolated from root nodules of Trifolium alexandrium L. We show here that R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 promote the growth of four different rice varieties grown in India in terms of biomass, root branching and N content. In addition, using scanning electron microscopy and viable cell counts, we provide evidence that the bacteria successfully colonize the root surface of the rice variety which showed maximum growth promotion upon inoculation. Not only this, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 exhibit a strong chemotaxis response towards the rice seed and root exudates despite the presence of a bacteriostatic phenolic compound, 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone). Further, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 secretion of phytohormones such as IAA and ACC deaminase suggest the potential of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria to be used as biofertilizer to enhance rice crop production in the subcontinent.

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Acknowledgements

We are thankful to Dr. V. Sikka of CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, India for providing the Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 strain for this work. We are also thankful to Sujay Bhattacharjee for his editorial help. One of the authors, RBB, is thankful to the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India for the Ph.D. fellowship and “The Embassy of France” in India for the “Sandwich Program” Fellowship.

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Correspondence to Rumpa Biswas Bhattacharjee.

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Bhattacharjee, R.B., Jourand, P., Chaintreuil, C. et al. Indole acetic acid and ACC deaminase-producing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SN10 promote rice growth, and in the process undergo colonization and chemotaxis. Biol Fertil Soils 48, 173–182 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00374-011-0614-9

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Keywords

  • Chemotaxis
  • Flavonoids
  • Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR)
  • Rhizobium
  • Rice