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Risk factors for open-angle glaucoma and recommendations for glaucoma screening

Risikofaktoren für das Offenwinkelglaukom und Empfehlungen zur Glaukomfrüherkennung

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Zusammenfassung

Offenwinkelglaukome sind eine Gruppe chronisch progredienter Optikusneuropathien mit gonioskopisch offenem Kammerwinkel. Sie stellen eine der Hauptursachen für Sehbehinderung und Blindheit in den Industrieländern dar. Im Rahmen dieses Beitrags sollen Epidemiologie und Risikofaktoren für das Auftreten des Offenwinkelglaukoms diskutiert und bewertet werden sowie das Vorgehen bei der Früherkennung eines Offenwinkelglaukoms gemäß der kürzlich erschienen S2e-Leitlinie der Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften (AWMF) vorgestellt werden.

Abstract

Open-angle glaucomas are a group of chronic progressive optic nerve neuropathies with a gonioscopic open anterior chamber angle. They are one of the main causes of visual impairment and blindness in industrialized countries. The aim of this article is to discuss and evaluate the epidemiology and risk factors for the development of open-angle glaucoma and to present the screening procedure for open-angle glaucoma according to the recently published S2e guidelines of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF).

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the editorial committee of the guideline on “Assessment of risk factors for the occurrence of open-angle glaucoma” (Prof. Dr. B. Bertram, Dr. D. Claessens, Prof. Dr. T. Dietlein, Prof. Dr. C. Erb, Prof. Dr. R. Burk, Prof. Dr. T. Klink, Prof. Dr. T. Reinhard, A. Ostrowski, Prof. Dr. N. Pfeiffer, Prof. Dr. E. Hoffmann, Prof. Dr. A. Schuster). Only on the basis of this guideline could this CME article be created.

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Correspondence to Alexander K. Schuster.

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A.K. Schuster: A. Financial interests: Research funding at personal disposal: Allergan, Novartis, Bayer Vital (financial support for research), Heidelberg Engineering, PlusOptix (equipment). B. Non-financial interests: Endowed professorship in ophthalmological care research, donated by the Stiftung Auge and financed by DOG and BVA, Eye Clinic and Polyclinic University Medicine Mainz. Memberships: DOG, BVA, EGS, Euretina, ARVO. F.M. Wagner: A. Financial interests: F. Wagner states that there is no financial conflict of interest. B. Non-financial interests: Assistant physician at the University Eye Hospital Mainz, Mainz. Memberships: DOG, BVA, DGII, ESCRS. N. Pfeiffer: A. Financial interests: Research funding at personal disposal: Allergan, Alcon, Boehringer Ingelheim, Aerie, Santen, Novartis, further education funding. Speaker’s fee or reimbursement of costs as passive participant: Santen, Novartis, Aerie, Allergan. Paid advisor/internal training reference/salary recipient or similar: Allergan, Aerie, Santen, Novartis. B. Non-financial interests: Director of the Eye Clinic and Polyclinic of the University Medical Center Mainz. Memberships: DOG, BVA, ARVO, American Academy of Ophthalmology, European Glaucoma Society, Glaucoma Research Society. E.M. Hoffmann: A. Financial interests: Speaker’s fee or reimbursement as passive participant: Santen, Pharm-Allergan, Heidelberg Engineering, Novartis, MEyeTech. Paid consultant/internal training reference/salary recipient or similar: Santen, Pharm-Allergan, Heidelberg Engineering, Novartis, MEyeTech. B. Non-financial interests: Senior Physician at the Eye Clinic and Policlinic of the University Medical Center Mainz of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Head of the Department of Glaucoma Diseases of the Eye Clinic and Policlinic of the University Medical Center Mainz, Head of the Pediatric Glaucoma Center at the Eye Clinic and Policlinic of the University Medical Center Mainz. Memberships: DOG, BVA, EGS.

For this article no studies with human participants or animals were performed by any of the authors. All studies mentioned were in accordance with the ethical standards indicated in each case.

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Schuster, A.K., Wagner, F.M., Pfeiffer, N. et al. Risk factors for open-angle glaucoma and recommendations for glaucoma screening. Ophthalmologe 118 (Suppl 2), 145–152 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00347-021-01378-5

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