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Urolithiasis: evaluation, dietary factors, and medical management: an update of the 2014 SIU-ICUD international consultation on stone disease

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this review was to provide current best evidence for evaluation, dietary, and medical management of patients with urolithiasis.

Methods

Literature addressing evaluation, dietary, and medical management of urolithiasis was searched. Papers were analyzed and rated according to level of evidence (LOE), whereupon a synthesis of the evidence was made. Grade of recommendation (GOR) was judged from individual clinical experience and knowledge of the evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine.

Results

It is obvious that different stone diseases influence the life of stone-forming individuals very differently, and that evaluation and medical management should be personalized according to risk of recurrence, severity of stone disease, presence of associated medical conditions, and patient’s motivation. With regard to evaluation, dietary and medical management of patients with urolithiasis evidence from the literature suggest that selective metabolic evaluation may lead to rational dietary and medical management. Statements based on LOE and GOR are provided to guide clinical practice.

Conclusion

The provided evidence for evaluation of patients with urolithiasis aims at defining patients at high risk for recurrent/complicated stone disease. Based on this approach, evidence-based dietary and medical management regimes are suggested.

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Correspondence to Palle Jörn Osther.

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Jung, H., Andonian, S., Assimos, D. et al. Urolithiasis: evaluation, dietary factors, and medical management: an update of the 2014 SIU-ICUD international consultation on stone disease. World J Urol 35, 1331–1340 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00345-017-2000-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00345-017-2000-1

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