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Paleo-fluvial sedimentation on the outer shelf of the East China Sea during the last glacial maximum

Abstract

Evidence from lithology, foraminiferal assemblages, and high-resolution X-ray fluorescence scanning data of core SFK-1 indicates tidally influenced paleo-fluvial sedimentation during the last glacial maximum (LGM) on the outer shelf of the East China Sea. The paleo-fluvial deposits consist of river channel facies and estuarine incised-valley-filling facies. Different reflections on the seismic profile across core SFK-1 suggest that the river channels shifted and overlapped. River channel deposition formed early in the LGM when sea level fell and the estuary extended to the outer shelf. Channel sediments are yellowish-brown in color and rich in foraminifera and shell fragments owing to the strong tidal influence. Following the LGM, the paleo-river mouth retreated and regressive deposition of estuarine and incised-valley-filling facies with an erosion base occurred. The river channel facies and estuarine incised-valley-filling facies have clearly different sedimentary characteristics and provenances. The depositional environment of the paleoriver system on the wide shelf was reconstructed from the foraminiferal assemblages, CaCO3 content and Ca/Ti ratio. The main results of this study provide further substantial constraints on the recognition of late Quaternary stratigraphy and land-sea interactions on the ECS shelf.

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Correspondence to Zhongbo Wang or Shouye Yang.

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Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41040041, 41206053, 41225020, and 41076018), the Continental Shelf Drilling Program (No. GZH201100202), and the China Geological Survey (Nos. 1212010611301 and GZH200800501)

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Wang, Z., Yang, S., Zhang, Z. et al. Paleo-fluvial sedimentation on the outer shelf of the East China Sea during the last glacial maximum. Chin. J. Ocean. Limnol. 31, 886–894 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00343-013-2253-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00343-013-2253-5

Keyword

  • outer shelf
  • East China Sea
  • LGM (last glacial maximum)
  • paleo-river channel
  • fluvial deposition
  • paleoenvironment