Coral Reefs

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 1005–1015 | Cite as

Coral–macroalgal phase shifts or reef resilience: links with diversity and functional roles of herbivorous fishes on the Great Barrier Reef

  • A. J. Cheal
  • M. Aaron MacNeil
  • E. Cripps
  • M. J. Emslie
  • M. Jonker
  • B. Schaffelke
  • H. Sweatman
Report

Abstract

Changes from coral to macroalgal dominance following disturbances to corals symbolize the global degradation of coral reefs. The development of effective conservation measures depends on understanding the causes of such phase shifts. The prevailing view that coral–macroalgal phase shifts commonly occur due to insufficient grazing by fishes is based on correlation with overfishing and inferences from models and small-scale experiments rather than on long-term quantitative field studies of fish communities at affected and resilient sites. Consequently, the specific characteristics of herbivorous fish communities that most promote reef resilience under natural conditions are not known, though this information is critical for identifying vulnerable ecosystems. In this study, 11 years of field surveys recorded the development of the most persistent coral–macroalgal phase shift (>7 years) yet observed on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR). This shift followed extensive coral mortality caused by thermal stress (coral bleaching) and damaging storms. Comparisons with two similar reefs that suffered similar disturbances but recovered relatively rapidly demonstrated that the phase shift occurred despite high abundances of one herbivore functional group (scraping/excavating parrotfishes: Labridae). However, the shift was strongly associated with low fish herbivore diversity and low abundances of algal browsers (predominantly Siganidae) and grazers/detritivores (Acanthuridae), suggesting that one or more of these factors underpin reef resilience and so deserve particular protection. Herbivorous fishes are not harvested on the GBR, and the phase shift was not enhanced by unusually high nutrient levels. This shows that unexploited populations of herbivorous fishes cannot ensure reef resilience even under benign conditions and suggests that reefs could lose resilience under relatively low fishing pressure. Predictions of more severe and widespread coral mortality due to global climate change emphasize the need for more effective identification and protection of ecosystem components that are critical for the prevention of coral reef phase shifts.

Keywords

Coral reef Herbivorous fishes Macroalgae Phase shift Diversity Resilience 

Supplementary material

338_2010_661_MOESM1_ESM.doc (34 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 34 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Cheal
    • 1
  • M. Aaron MacNeil
    • 1
  • E. Cripps
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. J. Emslie
    • 1
  • M. Jonker
    • 1
  • B. Schaffelke
    • 1
  • H. Sweatman
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Institute of Marine ScienceTownsvilleAustralia
  2. 2.School of Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia

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