Advertisement

European Radiology

, Volume 7, Issue 8, pp 1211–1214 | Cite as

Fast spin echo vs conventional spin echo in cervical spine imaging

  • A. R. Gillams
  • J. A. Soto
  • A. P. Carter
Original article

Abstract

The major attraction of fast-spin-echo (FSE) imaging is reduced acquisition time; however, careful review of the literature reveals many weaknesses: phase-encoded blurring, truncation artefact, bright fat signal, reduced magnetic susceptibility and increased motion artefact. Our aim was a prospective, blinded comparison of FSE and conventional spin echo (CSE) in the cervical spine. Both sequences were performed in 43 patients (19 males and 24 females; mean age 45 years, range 15–66 years). Twenty-eight patients were studied at 1.5 T and 15 at 0.5 T. Typical sequence parameters were: at 1.5 T, TR/TE 2000/90 CSE and 3000/120 FSE, and at 0.5 T, 2200/80 CSE and 2800/120 FSE. Time saved on the FSE was used to increase the matrix and the number of acquisitions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the images for pathology, artefacts, disc signal intensity, thecal sac compression and image quality. Ten patients had cord lesions; 2 (20 %) were missed on CSE. In 4 of 10 patients with moderate/severe thecal sac compression, the degree of stenosis was apparently exaggerated on CSE. The mean degree of confidence for the CSE sequences was 1.8 and for the FSE 1.1, where 1 is optimal. For cervical spine imaging, FSE should be preferred to CSE.

Key words: Fast spin echo Spine MR 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Gillams
    • 1
  • J. A. Soto
    • 1
  • A. P. Carter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical School and Boston City Hospital Imaging Foundation, Boston, MA 02118USA

Personalised recommendations