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Polar Biology

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 196–204 | Cite as

Growth and reproduction of the endemic cruciferous species Pringlea antiscorbutica in Kerguelen Islands

  • J. -L. Chapuis
  • F. Hennion
  • V. Le Roux
  • J. Le Cuziat
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

This paper presents the first results from a 7-year monitoring of Pringlea plants established naturally from seed at Kerguelen at two sites with different microenvironmental characteristics. The field growth and reproductive traits of Pringlea are reported for the first time. Pringlea plants grow much faster than was previously believed, attaining around 50 cm diameter in 4 years. The growth pause in winter is short. Pringlea first flowers mainly in its 3rd or 4th year of growth and, as such, this species can be described as an early-flowering perennial. Inter-individual variability for all growth and reproductive parameters was generally higher than inter-site variability. These biological traits are compared to other subantarctic phanerogams and are discussed in terms of adaptation to subantarctic climate and ecological distribution of Pringlea antiscorbutica.

Keywords

Reproductive Trait Reproductive Parameter Biological Trait Field Growth Ecological Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. -L. Chapuis
    • 1
  • F. Hennion
    • 2
  • V. Le Roux
    • 1
  • J. Le Cuziat
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire d'Evolution des systèmes naturels et modifiés, Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (UMR 6553, Rennes 1), 36 rue Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, F-75005 Paris, France e-mail: chapuis@mnhn.fr; Fax: +33-1-40793273FR
  2. 2.UMR 6553, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex, FranceFR

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