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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 33, Issue 10, pp 1687–1696 | Cite as

Expression patterns of WRKY genes in di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra in response to salinity stress revealed by quantitative real-time PCR and RNA sequencing

  • Shengji Wang
  • Jiying Wang
  • Wenjing Yao
  • Boru Zhou
  • Renhua Li
  • Tingbo JiangEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Key message

Spatio-temporal expression patterns of 13 out of 119 poplar WRKY genes indicated dynamic and tissue-specific roles of WRKY family proteins in salinity stress tolerance.

Abstract

To understand the expression patterns of poplar WRKY genes under salinity stress, 51 of the 119 WRKY genes were selected from di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). We used qRT-PCR to profile the expression of the top 13 genes under salinity stress across seven time points, and employed RNA-Seq platforms to cross-validate it. Results demonstrated that all the 13 WRKY genes were expressed in root, stem, and leaf tissues, but their expression levels and overall patterns varied notably in these tissues. Regarding overall gene expression in roots, the 13 genes were significantly highly expressed at all six time points after the treatment, reaching the plateau of expression at hour 9. In leaves, the 13 genes were similarly up-regulated from 3 to 12 h in response to NaCl treatment. In stems, however, expression levels of the 13 genes did not show significant changes after the NaCl treatment. Regarding individual gene expression across the time points and the three tissues, the 13 genes can be classified into three clusters: the lowly expressed Cluster 1 containing PthWRKY28, 45 and 105; intermediately expressed Clusters 2 including PthWRKY56, 88 and 116; and highly expressed Cluster 3 consisting of PthWRKY41, 44, 51, 61, 62, 75 and 106. In general, genes in Cluster 2 and 3 displayed a dynamic pattern of “induced amplification—recovering”, suggesting that these WRKY genes and corresponding pathways may play a critical role in mediating salt response and tolerance in a dynamic and tissue-specific manner.

Keywords

WRKY Gene expression Populussimonii × P. nigra Salinity stress 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (2013AA102701) and the Fundamental Research Funds for The Central Universities Project (DL12CA16).

Conflict of interest

The authors have declared no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

299_2014_1647_MOESM1_ESM.doc (284 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 284 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shengji Wang
    • 1
  • Jiying Wang
    • 1
  • Wenjing Yao
    • 1
  • Boru Zhou
    • 1
  • Renhua Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tingbo Jiang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and BreedingNortheast Forestry UniversityHarbinChina
  2. 2.Windber Research InstituteWindberUSA

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