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Distinct Osmoadaptation Strategies in the Strict Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria Isolated from Lunsu Salt Water Body of North West Himalayas

Abstract

Two strict halophilic bacterial strains, Halobacillus trueperi SS1, and Halobacillus trueperi SS3, and three halotolerant bacterial strains, Shewanella algae SS2, Halomonas venusta SS5, and Marinomonas sp. SS8 of Lunsu salt water body, Himachal Pradesh, India, were selected to study the mechanism of salt tolerance and the role of osmolytes therein. A combination of flame photometry, chromatographic and colorimetric assays was used to study the mechanism of salt tolerance in the selected strict halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains. The strict halophiles and, one of the halotolerants, Marinomonas sp. SS8 were found to utilize both “salt-in strategy” and “accumulation of compatible solutes strategy” for osmoregulation in hypersaline conditions. On the contrary, the remaining two halotolerants used “accumulation of compatible solutes strategy” under saline stress and not the “salt-in strategy”. The present study suggests towards distinct mechanisms of salt tolerance in the two classes, wherein strict halophiles accumulate compatible solutes as well as adopt salt-in strategy, while the halotolerant bacteria accumulate a range of compatible solutes, except Marinomonas sp. SS8, which utilizes both the strategies to combat salt stress.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge Prof Prem Kumar Khosla, Vice Chancellor, Shoolini University, Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India, for infrastructural support in this study and members of Yeast Biology laboratory for helpful discussion. We also acknowledge Dr. Sonika Gupta, Yeast Biology Laboratory for isolating the halophilic bacterial strains from Lunsu salt water body.

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Correspondence to Anuradha Sourirajan.

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Vaidya, S., Dev, K. & Sourirajan, A. Distinct Osmoadaptation Strategies in the Strict Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria Isolated from Lunsu Salt Water Body of North West Himalayas. Curr Microbiol 75, 888–895 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-018-1462-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-018-1462-8