Current Microbiology

, Volume 74, Issue 7, pp 787–797 | Cite as

Isolation of Viable but Non-culturable Bacteria from Printing and Dyeing Wastewater Bioreactor Based on Resuscitation Promoting Factor

  • Yi Jin
  • Guojuan Gan
  • Xiaoyun Yu
  • Dongdong Wu
  • Li Zhang
  • Na Yang
  • Jiadan Hu
  • Zhiheng Liu
  • Lixin Zhang
  • Huachang Hong
  • Xiaoqing Yan
  • Yan Liang
  • Linxian Ding
  • Yonglong Pan
Article
  • 407 Downloads

Abstract

Printing and dyeing wastewater with high content of organic matters, high colority, and poor biochemical performance is hard to be degraded. In this study, we isolated viable but non-culturable (VBNC) bacteria from printing and dyeing wastewater with the culture media contained resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf) protein secreted by Micrococcus luteus, counted the culturable cells number with the most probable number, sequenced 16S rRNA genes, and performed polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. It is obviously that the addition of Rpf in the enrichment culture could promote growth and resuscitation of bacteria in VBNC state to obtain more fastidious bacteria significantly. The identified bacteria were assigned to nine genera in the treatment group, while the two strains of Ochrobactrum anthropi and Microbacterium sp. could not be isolated from the control group. The function of isolated strains was explored and these strains could degrade the dye of Congo red. This study provides a new sight into the further study including the present state, composition, formation mechanism, and recovery mechanism about VBNC bacteria in printing and dyeing wastewater, which would promote to understand bacterial community in printing and dyeing wastewater, and to obtain VBNC bacteria from ecological environment.

Keywords

Bioreactor of printing and dyeing wastewater VBNC bacteria Rpf 16S rRNA gene sequence Phylogenetic relationship PCR-DGGE 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Public Welfare Technology Applied Research Project (2017C33046), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (LY13C010002), Shenzhen Basic Research Project (JCYJ20140417113430641, JCYJ20140509174140691 and JCYJ20140417113430732), Foundation of Shenzhen Strategic Emerging Industries Development (JSKF20150831171545604) and Shenzhen Technology development Project (CXZZ20150529144041624).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

We declare that we do not have any commercial or associative interest that represents a conflict of interest in connection with the work submitted.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi Jin
    • 1
  • Guojuan Gan
    • 2
  • Xiaoyun Yu
    • 1
  • Dongdong Wu
    • 3
  • Li Zhang
    • 4
    • 5
  • Na Yang
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jiadan Hu
    • 3
  • Zhiheng Liu
    • 4
  • Lixin Zhang
    • 4
  • Huachang Hong
    • 3
  • Xiaoqing Yan
    • 2
  • Yan Liang
    • 2
  • Linxian Ding
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yonglong Pan
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Chemistry and Life SciencesZhejiang Normal UniversityJinhuaPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Laboratory for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, ShenZhen Institutes of Advanced TechnologyChinese Academy of SciencesShenzhenPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Geography and Environmental SciencesZhejiang Normal UniversityJinhuaPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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