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Current Microbiology

, Volume 70, Issue 2, pp 154–155 | Cite as

Molecular Characterization of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile in a Northern Italian Hospital

  • Francesco G. De Rosa
  • Paolo Cavallerio
  • Silvia CorcioneEmail author
  • Caterina Parlato
  • Lucina Fossati
  • Roberto Serra
  • Giovanni Di Perri
  • Rossana Cavallo
Article

Abstract

Clostridium difficile is responsible for more than 90 % of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The most important virulence factors are two toxins called enterotoxin A and cytotoxin B; some C. difficile strains contain the C. difficile binary toxin (CDT). The aim of our study was to prospectively analyze C. difficile clinical isolates in a single center to determine the molecular features of collected strains. Among the 252 isolates, 217 were A + B + (86.1 %), 33 were A + B + cdt + (13.1 %) and 2 were A − B + (0.8 %). There were 15 different ribotypes with a predominance of 018.

Keywords

Fluoroquinolones Moxifloxacin Clostridium Difficile Pseudomembranous Colitis Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco G. De Rosa
    • 1
  • Paolo Cavallerio
    • 2
  • Silvia Corcione
    • 1
    Email author
  • Caterina Parlato
    • 2
  • Lucina Fossati
    • 2
  • Roberto Serra
    • 2
  • Giovanni Di Perri
    • 1
  • Rossana Cavallo
    • 2
  1. 1.Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Amedeo di Savoia HospitalUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  2. 2.Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Department of Public Health and Pediatric SciencesUniversity of TurinTurinItaly

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