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Current Microbiology

, Volume 68, Issue 5, pp 604–609 | Cite as

Improved Insecticidal Toxicity by Fusing Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis with Av3 of Anemonia viridis

  • Fu Yan
  • Xing Cheng
  • Xuezhi Ding
  • Ting Yao
  • Hanna Chen
  • Wenping Li
  • Shengbiao Hu
  • Ziquan Yu
  • Yunjun Sun
  • Youming Zhang
  • Liqiu Xia
Article

Abstract

Av3, a neurotoxin of Anemonia viridis, is toxic to crustaceans and cockroaches but inactive in mammals. In the present study, Av3 was expressed in Escherichia coli Origami B (DE3) and purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The purified Av3 was injected into the hemocoel of Helicoverpa armigera, rendering the worm paralyzed. Then, Av3 was expressed alone or fusion expressed with the Cry1Ac in acrystalliferous strain CryB of Bacillus thuringiensis. The shape of Cry1Ac was changed by fusion with Av3. The expressed fusion protein, Cry1AcAv3, formed irregular rhombus- or crescent-shaped crystalline inclusions, which is quite different from the shape of original Cry1Ac crystals. The toxicity of Cry1Ac was improved by fused expression. Compared with original Cry1Ac expressed in CryB, the oral toxicity of Cry1AcAv3 to H. armigera was elevated about 2.6-fold. No toxicity was detected when Av3 was expressed in CryB alone. The present study confirmed that marine toxins could be used in bio-control and implied that fused expression with other insecticidal proteins could be an efficient way for their application.

Keywords

cry2Ab Gene Peptide Toxin Overlap Extension Polymerase Chain Reaction Synthetic cry1Ac Isatis Indigotica 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Dr. Yehu Moran and Prof. Michael Gurevitz of Tel Aviv University for providing the pET32b vector and their good advice. This investigation was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30970066; 31070006; 30900037), National High Technology Research and Development project (863) of China (2011AA10A203), and the Hunan province science and technology program (2010 FJ 2002).

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (PDF 109 kb)
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Supplementary material 2 (PDF 299 kb)
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Supplementary material 3 (PDF 36 kb)
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Supplementary material 4 (PDF 69 kb)
284_2013_516_MOESM5_ESM.pdf (51 kb)
Supplementary material 5 (PDF 51 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fu Yan
    • 1
  • Xing Cheng
    • 1
  • Xuezhi Ding
    • 1
  • Ting Yao
    • 1
  • Hanna Chen
    • 1
  • Wenping Li
    • 1
  • Shengbiao Hu
    • 1
  • Ziquan Yu
    • 1
  • Yunjun Sun
    • 1
  • Youming Zhang
    • 1
  • Liqiu Xia
    • 1
  1. 1.Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Microbial Molecular Biology-State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Microbial Molecular Biology and College of Life ScienceHunan Normal UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China

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