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The Mathematical Intelligencer

, Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 14–17 | Cite as

Does 2 + 3 = 5? In Defence of a Near Absurdity

  • Mary Leng
Open Access
Article

References

  1. Alan Baker (2005), “Are there Genuine Mathematical Explanations of Physical Phenomena?” Mind 114: 223–238.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of YorkHeslingtonUK

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