Seminars in Immunopathology

, 30:371

The long road to the thymus: the generation, mobilization, and circulation of T-cell progenitors in mouse and man

  • Daniel A. Zlotoff
  • Benjamin A. Schwarz
  • Avinash Bhandoola
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00281-008-0133-4

Cite this article as:
Zlotoff, D.A., Schwarz, B.A. & Bhandoola, A. Semin Immunopathol (2008) 30: 371. doi:10.1007/s00281-008-0133-4

Abstract

The majority of T cells develop in the thymus. T-cell progenitors in the thymus do not self-renew and so progenitor cells must be continuously imported from the blood into the thymus to maintain T-cell production. Recent work has shed light on both the identity of the cells that home to the thymus and the molecular mechanisms involved. This review will discuss the cells in the bone marrow and blood that are involved in early thymopoiesis in mouse and man. Understanding the pre-thymic steps in T-cell development may translate into new therapeutics, especially in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Keywords

Hematopoietic stem cells Hematopoietic progenitors Mobilization Thymic settling Early thymic progenitors 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel A. Zlotoff
    • 1
  • Benjamin A. Schwarz
    • 2
  • Avinash Bhandoola
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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