Advertisement

Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 465–470 | Cite as

Common trunk of the posterior intercostal arteries from the thoracic aorta: anatomical variation, frequency, and importance in individuals

  • Lidija Kocbek
  • Mateja Rakuša
Anatomic Variations
  • 95 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

A common trunk of the posterior intercostal arteries originating from the descending thoracic aorta is normally an anatomical variation. A search through the literature disclosed the frequencies of common trunks variations among population, but no information relates to particular topic of simultaneous multiple common trunks of the PIA present in individuals.

Methods

A total of 396 intercostal spaces were dissected in 44 cadavers from the vertebral body to the mid-axillary line to observe a common trunk of the paired posterior intercostal artery at the level from T2 to T11 intercostal space.

Results

In 31 cadavers (70%), a common trunk of posterior intercostal arteries arising from descending thoracic aorta was visualed and 22 of those (71%) had two or more common trunks simultaneously present.

Conclusions

It is important to recognize this anatomical variation when the number of origins of the posterior intercostal arteries from the thoracic aorta due to the multiple common trunk present can be reduced, as their origins and vascular territories are involved in primary diseases of the thoracic aorta, like atherosclerosis, aneurysm, or dissection that lead to serious complications. For example, in thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, reimplantation of the posterior intercostal arteries is recommended to avoid potential ischemic injury to the supplying areas, especially to the spinal cord.

Keywords

Posterior intercostal arteries, a common trunk Anatomic variation Thoracoabdominal aneurysm 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors thank o.Univ.-Prof. Dr.med.univ. Dr.h.c. Friedrich Anderhuber and laboratory personnel of the Institute of Anatomy, Medical University of Graz, to provide the material and technical support for the study. Thanks and gratefulness goes to people who donated themselves for the scientific research.

Compliance with ethical standards

Ethical standards

The people donated their bodies for teaching and research purposes to the Institute of Anatomy, Medical University of Graz, Austria, between 2008 and 2010. A written consent according to the Institute’s regulations was acquired. The study protocol was approved by The National Medical Ethics Committee of the Republic of Slovenia (NMEC), University Institute of Clinical Neurophysiology, Medical Center Ljubljana, Slovenia and, therefore, performed in accordance with the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Hollinshead WH (1972) Anatomy for surgeons. vol. II. The thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Harper & Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Moore KL, Dalley AF (2006) Clinical oriented anatomy, 5th edn. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Williams PL, Warwick R (1980) Gray’s anatomy, 36th edn. Churchill Livingstone, EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Adachi B (1928) Das Arteriensystem der Japaner, vol 2. Maruzen, KyotoGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chang J, Rubin GD (2009) Solitary intercostal arterial trunk: a previously unreported anatomical variant. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2:e49-50CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Khan S, Haust MD (1979) Variation in the aortic origin of intercostal arteries in man. Anat Rec 195:545–552CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lippert H, Pabst R (1985) Arterial variation in man. Classification and frequency. J.F. Bergmann Verlag, MunichCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Nathan H, Barkay M, Orda R (1970) Anatomical observation on the origin and course of the aortic intercostal arteries. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 59:372–375PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bing J, Dong Y, Sen J (2016) Anomalous posterior intercostal arterial trunk arising from the abdominal aorta. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 39:624–627CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Schoenwolf GC, Bleyl SB, Brauer PR, Francis-West PH (2009) Larsen’s human embryology, 4th edn. Churchill Livingstone, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Shimizu S, Tanaka R, Kan S, Suzuki S, Kurata A, Fujii K (2005) Origins of the segmental arteries in the aorta: an anatomic study for selective catheterization with spinal arteriography. Am J Neuroradiol 26:922–928PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Thiel W (1992) The preservation of the whole corpse with natural color. Ann Anat 174:185–195CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Thiel W (1992) An arterial injection mass for the preservation of complete cadavers. Ann Anat 174:197–200CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Feigl G, Benkhadra M, Lenfant F, Trouilloud P, Anderhuber F, Bonniaud P, Fasel JHD, Nemetz W (2008) Bronchoscopy and cricothyrotomy: results from cadavers embalmed with Thiel’s method compared to other embalming methods and living subjects. Acta Medico-Biotechnica 1:25–36Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ravi BS, Nanda NC, Htay T, Dod HS, Agrawal G (2007) Transesophageal echocardiographic identification of normal and stenosed posterior intercostal arteries. Echocardiography 20:609–615CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Virmani R, Burke A, Farb A, Atkinson JB (2001) Cardiovascular pathology. Major problems in pathology, vol 40, 2nd edn. W.B. Saunders, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Kasper DL, Braunwald E, Fauci AS, Hauser SL, Longo DL, Jameson JL (2005) Harrison’s principles of internal medicine, 16th edn. McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing Division, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Rosenberg HS, Bolande RP (1987) Perspectives in pediatric pathology. vol. IV. Year Book Medical Publishers Inc, ChichagoGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Mathers LH, Chase RA, Dolph J, Glasgow EF, Gosling JA (1996) Clinical anatomy principles. Mosby, St. LouisGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Safi HJ, Miller CC, Carr C, Iliopoulos DC, Dorsay DA, Baldwin JC (1998) Importance of intercostal artery reattachment during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. J Vasc Surg 27:58–66CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Toda K, Taniguchi K, Kainuma S, Yokota T (2008) Novel technique for reimplantation of intercostal arteries using tailored patch graft. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 34:458–459CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Usui A, Hosokawa H, Kawamura M, Hibi M (1996) Total intercostal artery reimplantation for descending thoracic aortic replacement. Ann Thorac Surg 62:1523–1525CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Halstead JC, Baghai M, Lim E, Dunning JJ, Large SR (2003) A method for descending aortic replacement retainig a posterior strip bearing intercostal vessels. Ann Thorac Surg 75:1660–1661CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Toyama M, Usui A, Akita T, Ueda Y (2006) A vascular tube for intercostal artery reimplantation. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 29:413–415CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of MariborMariborSlovenia

Personalised recommendations