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New anatomical insight of the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi and the transverse part of the nasalis

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to clarify the morphology and topography of the deep layer of levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle (LLSAN) and the transverse part of the nasalis. Anatomical variations in the topographic relationships were also described to understand the function of the LLSAN and the transverse part of the nasalis.

Methods

Anatomical dissections were performed on 40 specimens of embalmed Korean adult cadavers.

Results

The LLSAN was divided into two layers, which were superficial and deep in the levator labii superioris muscle (LLS), respectively. The superficial layer of LLSAN descended on the LLS, and the deep layer was located deep in the LLS. The deep layer of LLSAN originated from the superficial layer of LLSAN and the frontal process of the maxilla. It inserted between the levator anguli oris and the orbicularis oris muscles. This transverse part of the nasalis received some muscle fibers from the superficial layer of LLSAN in 90% (36/40) of specimens. The transverse part of the nasalis originated from the maxilla and ascended, passing posterior to the superficial layer of LLSAN in 65% (26/40) of specimens. However, it originated as two muscle bellies from the maxilla and the upper half of the alar facial crease, respectively, in 35% (14/40) of specimens.

Conclusions

These findings will be crucial data to understand the structure and function of the LLSAN and the transverse part of the nasalis.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (R13-2003-013-03001-0).

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Correspondence to H. J. Kim.

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Hur, M.S., Hu, K.S., Park, J.T. et al. New anatomical insight of the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi and the transverse part of the nasalis. Surg Radiol Anat 32, 753–756 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00276-010-0679-4

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Keywords

  • Levator labii superioris alaeque nasi
  • Transverse part of nasalis
  • Levator labii superioris
  • Alar facial crease