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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 512–520 | Cite as

Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model

  • J. J. WendlerEmail author
  • M. Porsch
  • S. Hühne
  • D. Baumunk
  • P. Buhtz
  • F. Fischbach
  • M. Pech
  • D. Mahnkopf
  • S. Kropf
  • A. Roessner
  • J. Ricke
  • M. Schostak
  • U.-B. Liehr
Laboratory Investigation

Abstract

Purpose

Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting.

Methods

Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days.

Results

A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney.

Conclusions

This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

Keywords

Irreversible electroporation Percutaneous ablation Kidney Animal model 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. This study was performed independently of the manufacturer of the devices used.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. J. Wendler
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. Porsch
    • 1
  • S. Hühne
    • 1
  • D. Baumunk
    • 1
  • P. Buhtz
    • 3
  • F. Fischbach
    • 2
  • M. Pech
    • 2
  • D. Mahnkopf
    • 5
  • S. Kropf
    • 4
  • A. Roessner
    • 3
  • J. Ricke
    • 2
  • M. Schostak
    • 1
  • U.-B. Liehr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyUniversity of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Pathology, University of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Biometry, University of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Medical Technology and ResearchRottmerslebenGermany

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