CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 576–582 | Cite as

Doxorubicin-Loaded QuadraSphere Microspheres: Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Intratumoral Drug Concentration in an Animal Model of Liver Cancer

  • Kwang-Hun Lee
  • Eleni A. Liapi
  • Curt Cornell
  • Philippe Reb
  • Manon Buijs
  • Josephina A. Vossen
  • Veronica Prieto Ventura
  • Jean-Francois H. Geschwind
Laboratory Investigation

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82–94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study’s end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer.

Keywords

Drug-eluting microspheres VX-2 tumor Liver tumor Hepatic artery chemoembolization Superabsorbent microspheres 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwang-Hun Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eleni A. Liapi
    • 1
  • Curt Cornell
    • 3
  • Philippe Reb
    • 4
  • Manon Buijs
    • 1
  • Josephina A. Vossen
    • 1
  • Veronica Prieto Ventura
    • 1
  • Jean-Francois H. Geschwind
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of RadiologyThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology & Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance HospitalYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.BioSphere MedicalRocklandUSA
  4. 4.Research and Development DepartmentBiosphere MedicalRoissy Charles de GaulleFrance
  5. 5.Division of Vascular and Interventional RadiologyThe Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA

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