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Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 446–451 | Cite as

Factors Affecting Symmetrization of the Contralateral Breast: A 7-Year Unilateral Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction Experience

  • Maria Stella LeoneEmail author
  • Virginia PrianoEmail author
  • Simonetta Franchelli
  • Valeria Puggioni
  • Domenico Franco Merlo
  • Matilde Mannucci
  • Pier Luigi Santi
Original Article

Abstract

Although a number of studies compare different techniques of breast reconstruction, information documenting the factors that affect breast symmetry after unilateral mastectomy and reconstruction seems to be scarce. A statistical analysis of 606 patients undergoing unilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction performed during a 7 year period was undertaken in an endeavor to identify these factors. Patients were classified according to time of reconstruction, method of reconstruction, type of implant, and mastectomy type. Contralateral procedures included mastopexy, augmentation, and reduction mammaplasty. Delayed reconstruction more frequently required a symmetrization than an immediate reconstruction. The percentage of contralateral procedures was higher for implant reconstructions than for autologous reconstructions, and the type of mastectomy was significantly associated with the symmetrization procedure. The findings showed that non–skin-sparing mastectomy (non-SSM) needed symmetrization surgery more frequently than did SSM procedures. The data suggest a preoperative collaboration and case study between oncologic and plastic surgeons to apply, when possible, SSM with immediate implant breast reconstruction, resulting in fewer symmetrization procedures and the best aesthetic follow-up result. These factors need to be considered when mastectomy and reconstruction are planned in order to optimize the aesthetic result together with the development of breast surgery specialty units.

Keywords

Breast reconstruction Breast symmetry Skin-sparing mastectomy Symmetrization Unilateral mastectomy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors express their special thanks to the surgeons who contributed with their clinical cases, namely, Pietro Berrino MD, Marisa Muggianu MD (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit IST Genoa), Adami Michaela MD (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit IST Genoa), Francesco Filippi MD.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Stella Leone
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Virginia Priano
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Simonetta Franchelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Valeria Puggioni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Domenico Franco Merlo
    • 3
  • Matilde Mannucci
    • 3
  • Pier Luigi Santi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery UnitNational Cancer Research InstituteGenovaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Morphological and Surgical Disciplines and Integrated MethodologiesUniversity of GenoaGenovaItaly
  3. 3.Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Clinical TrialsNational Cancer Research InstituteGenovaItaly

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