Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 62, Issue 12, pp 1947–1957

Spatial and temporal dynamics at manakin leks: reconciling lek traditionality with male turnover

  • Renata Durães
  • Bette A. Loiselle
  • John G. Blake
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-008-0626-0

Cite this article as:
Durães, R., Loiselle, B.A. & Blake, J.G. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2008) 62: 1947. doi:10.1007/s00265-008-0626-0

Abstract

Leks, display grounds where males congregate and females visit to copulate, are typically traditional in location, despite often high turnover of individual males. How leks can persist in face of male turnover is not well understood, in part due to a lack of detailed field data allowing for a clear understanding of lek dynamics. We followed the fate of individual males at 11 to 15 leks of the blue-crowned manakin Lepidothrix coronata across four breeding seasons to gain insights on how leks are formed and changed in space and time. Between years, leks were traditional in location despite changes in territory ownership due to male disappearance and recruitment. New males were equally likely to recruit by taking over existing territories or by establishing new territories. Recruitment was influenced by age, as recruits were more likely to be adults than subadults. Lek size did not affect the probabilities of a male recruiting or persisting at a territory, and vocalization rate, a correlate of mating success in this population, did not affect male persistence. We used our field data to model changes in lek size and composition over longer periods of time (100 years) to understand how lek traditionality can be reconciled with high male turnover. Our simulations showed that leks in our population rapidly stabilize in size despite changes in territory ownership and that rates of male recruitment and disappearance compensate each other, such that leks have the potential to persist for several decades after the original males have disappeared from them.

Keywords

Ecuador Lek dynamics Lepidothrix coronata Male turnover Pipridae Population dynamics Territoriality 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renata Durães
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bette A. Loiselle
    • 1
  • John G. Blake
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Whitney R. Harris World Ecology CenterUniversity of Missouri—St. LouisSt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.Center for Tropical Research, Institute of the EnvironmentUniversity of California-Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations