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High-flexion total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

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Abstract

This study is a systematic literature review of outcomes following total knee arthroplasty with implants specifically designed to enable increased knee flexion. English language comparative studies without date restriction were identified through a computerised literature search and bibliography review. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria representing a total of 399 high-flexion knee arthroplasties in 370 patients. Five studies reported greater flexion or range of motion; however, the methodological rigour was questionable with inadequate blinding, flawed participant selection, short follow-up periods and functional outcomes which lacked sensitivity. There was insufficient evidence of improved range of motion or functional performance after high-flexion knee arthroplasty.

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Correspondence to Michael Murphy.

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Murphy, M., Journeaux, S. & Russell, T. High-flexion total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review. International Orthopaedics (SICOT) 33, 887–893 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00264-009-0774-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00264-009-0774-5

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