Bone marrow myeloid cells in regulation of multiple myeloma progression

Abstract

Survival, growth, and response to chemotherapy of cancer cells depends strongly on the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment. In multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells that localizes preferentially in the bone marrow, the microenvironment is highly enriched with myeloid cells. The majority of myeloid cells are represented by mature and immature neutrophils. The contribution of the different myeloid cell populations to tumor progression and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma is discussed.

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Fig. 1

Abbreviations

CCL:

Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand

mDCs:

Myeloid dendritic cells

MM:

Multiple myeloma

M-MDSCs:

Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells

NETs:

Neutrophil extracellular traps

OCL:

Osteoclasts

pDCs:

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells

PMN-MDSCs:

Polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells

PSGL-1:

P-selectin glycoprotein ligand

RANK:

Receptor activator of NK-kappaB

RANKL:

Receptor activator of NK-kappaB ligand

TME:

Tumor microenvironment

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute of Health grants CA195020 and CA196788 (to Yulia Nefedova) and T32CA009171 (to Sarah E. Herlihy). The authors would like to thank Rachel E. Locke, PhD, for helping with the preparation of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Yulia Nefedova.

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This paper is a Focussed Research Review based on a presentation given at the conference Regulatory Myeloid Suppressor Cells: From Basic Discovery to Therapeutic Application which was hosted by the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, PA, USA, 16th–19th June, 2016. It is part of a Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy series of Focussed Research Reviews.

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Herlihy, S.E., Lin, C. & Nefedova, Y. Bone marrow myeloid cells in regulation of multiple myeloma progression. Cancer Immunol Immunother 66, 1007–1014 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00262-017-1992-0

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Keywords

  • Multiple myeloma
  • Cancer
  • Neutrophils
  • Myeloid-derived suppressor cells
  • Regulatory myeloid suppressor cells
  • Chemoresistance