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Abdominal CT manifestations of adverse events to immunotherapy: a primer for radiologists

Abstract

Immunotherapy is a rapidly growing field within oncology and is being increasingly used in the management of several malignancies. Due to their unique mechanism of action on the immune system and neoplastic cells, the response pattern and adverse events of this novel therapy are distinct from conventional systemic therapies. Accordingly, the imaging appearances following immunotherapy including adverse events are unique and at times perplexing. Imaging is integral to management of patients on immunotherapeutic agents and a thorough understanding of its mechanism, response patterns and adverse events is crucial for precise interpretation of imaging studies. This review provides a description of the mechanism of action of current immunotherapeutic agents and the organ-wise description of their side effects.

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Correspondence to Avinash Kambadakone.

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Pourvaziri, A., Parakh, A., Biondetti, P. et al. Abdominal CT manifestations of adverse events to immunotherapy: a primer for radiologists. Abdom Radiol 45, 2624–2636 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00261-020-02531-5

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Keywords

  • Immunotherapy
  • Adverse effects
  • Colitis