Skeletal Radiology

, Volume 45, Issue 11, pp 1565–1569 | Cite as

Intraosseous hibernoma: a rare adipocytic bone tumour

Case Report

Abstract

Hibernoma is a benign adipose tumour that contains foetal brown fat cells. We report a case of hibernoma arising in the left ischium of a 65-year-old female with a past history of ovarian carcinoma. The patient presented with a relatively short history of left sacral/hip pain. Radiologically, the lesion, which was large (5 cm) and sclerotic, had been stable for a number of years. Histologically, it was composed mainly of plump cells with foamy, multivacuolated cytoplasm. These cells showed no reaction for epithelial, melanoma or leucocyte markers but expressed FABP4/aP2 and S100, indicating that they were brown fat cells. There was no mitotic activity or nuclear pleomorphism and the lesion was diagnosed as a benign intraosseous hibernoma (IOH). IOH is a recently identified benign adipocytic lesion that presents typically as a sclerotic bone lesion. It has characteristic morphological and immunophenotypic features and should be regarded as a discrete primary bone tumour that needs to be distinguished from metastatic carcinoma/melanoma, chondrosarcoma and metabolic storage diseases containing numerous foamy macrophages.

Keywords

Hibernoma Adipose tissue Bone tumour Pelvis 

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Copyright information

© ISS 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Vlychou
    • 1
  • J. Teh
    • 1
  • D. Whitwell
    • 2
  • N. A. Athanasou
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyNuffield Orthopaedic CentreOxfordUK
  2. 2.Orthopaedic SurgeryNuffield Orthopaedic CentreOxfordUK
  3. 3.Department of PathologyNuffield Orthopaedic CentreOxfordUK
  4. 4.Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Nuffield Orthopaedic CentreUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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