Environmental Geology

, Volume 56, Issue 3–4, pp 741–752

Sulfation of calcitic and dolomitic lime mortars in the presence of diesel particulate matter

  • G. Cultrone
  • A. Arizzi
  • E. Sebastián
  • C. Rodriguez-Navarro
Special Issue

DOI: 10.1007/s00254-008-1379-9

Cite this article as:
Cultrone, G., Arizzi, A., Sebastián, E. et al. Environ Geol (2008) 56: 741. doi:10.1007/s00254-008-1379-9

Abstract

The sulfation of four types of calcitic and dolomitic lime mortars exposed to SO2 in the presence of particulate matter from diesel vehicle exhaust emissions has been investigated. The binders mineralogy and mortars texture are the main factors influencing the formation of deleterious sulfate salts. The type of binder also influences the pore size distribution and the total porosity of the mortars: for equal aggregate (quartz or dolomite), dolomitic lime mortars have smaller pores and higher porosity than calcitic ones. During the first 24 h exposure to SO2, calcitic lime mortars undergo a higher weight increase than dolomitic ones due to rapid formation of gypsum on their surface. However, at the end of the sulfation test (10 days), dolomitic mortars show a higher weight increase due to massive formation of epsomite and gypsum, which is facilitated by their higher porosity and the high reactivity of Mg phases in the porous and partially carbonated binder. Control samples (not covered with diesel particulate matter) also develop calcium and magnesium sulfates upon long term exposure to SO2. This is due to the presence of uncarbonated Ca and Mg hydroxides that promote SO2 fixation as sulfates. However, the amount and size of sulfate crystals are significantly smaller than those observed on samples covered with diesel particulate matter. These results show that diesel particulate matter enhances the sulfation of lime mortars and demonstrate that sulfation of dolomitic lime is an important mechanism for the in situ formation of highly soluble and deleterious hydrated magnesium sulfates (epsomite and hexahydrite). The use of dolomitic limes in the conservation of monuments exposed to air pollution in urban environments may therefore pose a significant risk.

Keywords

Dolomitic Calcitic Lime mortar Air pollution Diesel particulate matter Sulfation Gypsum Epsomite 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Cultrone
    • 1
  • A. Arizzi
    • 1
  • E. Sebastián
    • 1
  • C. Rodriguez-Navarro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mineralogy and PetrologyUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain

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