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Efficient co-displaying and artificial ratio control of α-amylase and glucoamylase on the yeast cell surface by using combinations of different anchoring domains

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Abstract

Recombinant yeast strains that display heterologous amylolytic enzymes on their cell surface via the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring system are considered as promising biocatalysts for direct ethanol production from starchy materials. For the effective hydrolysis of these materials, the ratio optimization of multienzyme activity displayed on the cell surface is important. In this study, we have presented a ratio control system of multienzymes displayed on the yeast cell surface by using different GPI-anchoring domains. The novel gene cassettes for the cell-surface display of Streptococcus bovis α-amylase and Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase were constructed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 promoter and two different GPI-anchoring regions derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 or SAG1. These gene cassettes were integrated into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome in different combinations. Then, the cell-surface α-amylase and glucoamylase activities and ethanol productivity of these recombinant strains were evaluated. The combinations of the gene cassettes of these enzymes affected the ratio of cell-surface α-amylase and glucoamylase activities and ethanol productivity of the recombinant strains. The highest ethanol productivity from raw starch was achieved by the strain harboring one α-amylase gene cassette carrying the SED1-anchoring region and two glucoamylase gene cassettes carrying the SED1-anchoring region (BY-AASS/GASS/GASS). This strain yielded 22.5 ± 0.6 g/L of ethanol from 100 g/L of raw starch in 120 h of fermentation.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the commission for the Development of Artificial Gene Synthesis Technology for Creating Innovative Biomaterial from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. This work was also supported in part by a Special Coordination Fund for Promoting Science and Technology, Creation of Innovative Centers for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Areas (Innovative BioProduction Kobe) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

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Correspondence to Akihiko Kondo.

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Inokuma, K., Yoshida, T., Ishii, J. et al. Efficient co-displaying and artificial ratio control of α-amylase and glucoamylase on the yeast cell surface by using combinations of different anchoring domains. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 99, 1655–1663 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-014-6250-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-014-6250-1

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