Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 92, Issue 3, pp 617–630 | Cite as

Microbial synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum and their cytotoxic effects against mouse mayo blast cancer C2C12 cells

  • Amrita Mishra
  • Suraj Kumar Tripathy
  • Rizwan Wahab
  • Song-Hoon Jeong
  • Inho Hwang
  • You-Bing Yang
  • Young-Soon Kim
  • Hyung-Shik Shin
  • Soon-Il Yun
Methods and protocols

Abstract

Microorganisms, their cell filtrates, and live biomass have been utilized for synthesizing various gold nanoparticles. The shape, size, stability as well as the purity of the bio synthesized nanoparticles become very essential for application purpose. In the present study, gold nanoparticles have been synthesized from the supernatant, live cell filtrate, and biomass of the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum. The fungus has been grown in potato dextrose broth which is also found to synthesize gold nanoparticles. The size of the particles has been investigated by Bio-TEM before purification, following purification and after storing the particles for 3 months under refrigerated condition. Different characterization techniques like X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV–visible spectroscopy have been used for analysis of the particles. The effect of reaction parameters such as pH and concentration of gold salt have also been monitored to optimize the morphology and dispersity of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. A pH range of 5 to 8 has favored the synthesis process whereas increasing concentration of gold salt (beyond 2 mM) has resulted in the formation of bigger sized and aggregated nanoparticles. Additionally, the cytotoxic nature of prepared nanoparticles has been analyzed using mouse mayo blast cancer C2C12 cells at different time intervals (24, 48, and 72 h) of incubation period. The cells are cultivated in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum with antibiotics (streptopenicillin) at 37°C in a 5% humidified environment of CO2. The medium has been replenished every other day, and the cells are subcultured after reaching the confluence. The viability of the cells is analyzed with 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method.

Keywords

Penicillium brevicompactum Gold nanoparticles Live cell filtrate pH value Gold ion concentration Cytotoxicity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amrita Mishra
    • 1
  • Suraj Kumar Tripathy
    • 2
  • Rizwan Wahab
    • 3
    • 4
  • Song-Hoon Jeong
    • 1
  • Inho Hwang
    • 4
  • You-Bing Yang
    • 4
  • Young-Soon Kim
    • 3
  • Hyung-Shik Shin
    • 3
  • Soon-Il Yun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science & Technology, College of Agriculture & Life SciencesChonbuk National UniversityJeonjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Korea Institute of Machinery & MaterialsDaejeonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Chemical Engineering, College of EngineeringChonbuk National UniversityJeonjuRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Animal Resources & Biotechnology, College of Agriculture & Life SciencesChonbuk National UniversityJeonjuRepublic of Korea

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