Antifungal potential of essential oil and various organic extracts of Nandina domestica Thunb. against skin infectious fungal pathogens

Abstract

This study was undertaken to assess the in vitro antifungal potential of the essential oil and n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Nandina domestica Thunb. against dermatophytes, the casual agents of superficial infections in animals and human beings. The oil (1,000 μg/disc) and extracts (1,500 μg/disc) revealed 31.1–68.6% and 19.2–55.1% antidermatophytic effect against Trichophyton rubrum KCTC 6345, T. rubrum KCTC 6375, T. rubrum KCTC 6352, Trichophyton mentagrophytes KCTC 6085, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6077, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6316, Microsporum canis KCTC 6591, M. canis KCTC 6348, and M. canis KCTC 6349, respectively, along with their respective minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 62.5 to 500 and 125 to 2,000 μg/ml. Also, the oil had strong detrimental effect on spore germination of all the tested dermatophytic fungi as well as concentration and time-dependent kinetic inhibition of T. rubrum KCTC 6375. The present results demonstrated that N. domestica mediated oil and extracts could be potential sources of natural fungicides to control certain important dermatophytic fungi.

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Correspondence to Sun Chul Kang.

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Bajpai, V.K., Yoon, J.I. & Kang, S.C. Antifungal potential of essential oil and various organic extracts of Nandina domestica Thunb. against skin infectious fungal pathogens. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 83, 1127–1133 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-009-2017-5

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Keywords

  • Nandina domestica Thunb.
  • Antifungal potential
  • Essential oil
  • Organic extracts
  • Skin infectious fungal pathogens