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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 68, Issue 2, pp 251–258 | Cite as

Oligomeric compounds formed from 2,5-xylidine (2,5-dimethylaniline) are potent enhancers of laccase production in Trametes versicolor ATCC 32745

  • Albert Kollmann
  • François-Didier Boyer
  • Paul-Henri Ducrot
  • Lucien Kerhoas
  • Claude Jolivalt
  • Isabelle Touton
  • Jacques Einhorn
  • Christian MouginEmail author
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

Abstract

Numerous chemicals, including the xenobiotic 2,5-xylidine, are known to induce laccase production in fungi. The present study was conducted to determine whether the metabolites formed from 2,5-xylidine by fungi could enhance laccase activity. We used purified laccases to transform the chemical and then we separated the metabolites, identified their chemical structure and assayed their effect on enzyme activity in liquid cultures of Trametes. versicolor. We identified 13 oligomers formed from 2,5-xylidine. (4E)-4-(2,5-dimethylphenylimino)-2,5-dimethylcyclohexa-2,5-dienone at 1.25×10−5 M was an efficient inducer, resulting in a nine-fold increase of laccase activity after 3 days of culture. Easily synthesized in one step (67% yield), this compound could be used in fungal bioreactors to obtain a great amount of laccases for biochemical or biotechnological purposes, with a low amount of inducer.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance High Performance Liquid Chromatography CH3CN Laccase Activity Laccase Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

We are very grateful to Dr. M. Asther (UBCF, INRA Luminy) for the generous gift of laccase purified from P. cinnabarinus ss3

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Kollmann
    • 1
  • François-Didier Boyer
    • 1
  • Paul-Henri Ducrot
    • 1
  • Lucien Kerhoas
    • 1
  • Claude Jolivalt
    • 2
  • Isabelle Touton
    • 1
  • Jacques Einhorn
    • 1
  • Christian Mougin
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Unité de Phytopharmacie et Médiateurs ChimiquesINRAVersailles CedexFrance
  2. 2.ENSCP, Laboratoire de Synthèse sélective organique et Produits naturelsUMR CNRS 7573Paris Cedex 05France

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