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Optimizing neonatal cardiac imaging (magnetic resonance/computed tomography)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT perform an important role in the evaluation of neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiography is not sufficient for surgical planning or postoperative follow-up. Cardiac MRI and cardiac CT have complementary applications in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease in neonates. This review focuses on the indications and technical aspects of these modalities and special considerations for imaging neonates with CHD.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Society for Pediatric Radiology cardiac CT angiography grant program along with Lorna Browne, MD, Prakash Masand, MD, and Cynthia Rigsby, MD, for their mentorship in further developing our cardiac CT angiography program. We would also like to acknowledge David Saul, MD, for his important contributions to our cardiac imaging group. We would like to thank Lydia Sheldon, MSEd, medical writer at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, for reviewing this manuscript.

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Correspondence to Karen I. Ramirez-Suarez.

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Ramirez-Suarez, K.I., Tierradentro-García, L.O., Otero, H.J. et al. Optimizing neonatal cardiac imaging (magnetic resonance/computed tomography). Pediatr Radiol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00247-021-05201-w

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Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Heart
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Neonates