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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 48, Issue 12, pp 1814–1816 | Cite as

Ultrasound diagnosis of tracheal cartilaginous sleeve in a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome

  • Matthew R. WannerEmail author
  • Megan B. Marine
  • John P. Dahl
Case Report

Abstract

There is an association between tracheal cartilaginous sleeve and syndromic craniosynostosis. We present a case of tracheal cartilaginous sleeve diagnosed by ultrasound (US) in a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome. The patient developed respiratory failure and was suspected at bronchoscopy to have tracheal cartilaginous sleeve. US performed before tracheostomy placement demonstrated continuous hypoechoic cartilage along the anterior surface of the trachea, confirming the diagnosis. Our report shows that US can make a definitive diagnosis of tracheal cartilaginous sleeve and raises the possibility of using US to screen for the condition in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis without the need for anesthesia or ionizing radiation.

Keywords

Cartilage Child Craniosynostosis Pfeiffer syndrome Trachea Tracheal cartilaginous sleeve Ultrasound 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of MedicineRiley Hospital for ChildrenIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of MedicineRiley Hospital for ChildrenIndianapolisUSA

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