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Pediatric Radiology

, 38:370 | Cite as

Non-accidental head injury—the evidence

  • Timothy J. David
Review

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Child Health, Booth Hall Children’s HospitalUniversity of Manchester, BlackleyManchesterUK

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