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Urological Research

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 249–255 | Cite as

Video cystometry in young infants with renal dilation or a history of urinary tract infection

  • Jian Wen
  • Chung-Kwong Yeung
  • Winnie C. Chu
  • France K. Shit
  • Constantine Metreweli
Original Paper

Abstract.

Cystometry is increasingly being used in infants to diagnose bladder dysfunction. However, infantile urodynamic patterns have not been fully established. In this study we investigated the urodynamic patterns in young infants with renal dilation or a history of urinary tract infection, but with no apparent lower urinary tract symptoms. We use video cystometry with simultaneous perineal EMG recording. Thirty-five infants (27 male and 8 female) with congenital renal dilatation or a history of urinary tract infection at age 2 days to 24 months old were involved. We found that detrusor instability occurred in 8.6% of these subjects. Bladder capacity increased with age but less than would nomally be expected. An intermittent voiding pattern was observed in 57% (20/35) of subjects and was characterized by a single or recurring increase in sphincter activity with a simultaneous rise in the voiding detrusor pressure curve. The maximum voiding detrusor pressure with pelvic floor overactivity was significantly higher than that with no pelvic floor overactivity (105±44 cmH2O vs 69±22 cmH2O, P<0.001). The median post-voiding residual volume was 2 (range 0 to 65) ml. We conclud that in infants with no apparent lower urinary tract symptoms, bladder instability is uncommon, and the capacity is lower than the normally expected range; an intermittent voiding pattern is common and the residual urine volume showed great variation. This probably represents an immature detrusor-sphincter function.

Cystometry Cystourethrography Pediatrics Voiding pattern 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jian Wen
    • 2
  • Chung-Kwong Yeung
    • 1
  • Winnie C. Chu
    • 1
  • France K. Shit
    • 1
  • Constantine Metreweli
    • 1
  1. 1.Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University and Henan Medical University, Zhengzhou city, 450052, P. R. China

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