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A novel CYP24A1 genotype associated to a clinical picture of hypercalcemia, nephrolithiasis and low bone mass

An Erratum to this article was published on 24 November 2016

Abstract

Mutations of the CYP24A1 gene, encoding for the enzyme 25(OH)D-24-hydroxylase, can cause hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. We report the case of a 22-year-old male patient with recurrent nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, hypercalcemia with low parathyroid hormone levels, hypercalciuria and low bone mass. Gene sequencing showed that the patient had compound heterozygous mutations including a novel genotype of the CYP24A1 gene. Genetic CYP24A1 testing and biochemical analyses were offered to other family members; the father was heterozygous for the same novel genotype and was also affected with recurrent nephrolithiasis.

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Correspondence to Pietro Manuel Ferraro.

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All authors declare no conflict of interest.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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An erratum to this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00240-016-0940-3.

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Ferraro, P.M., Minucci, A., Primiano, A. et al. A novel CYP24A1 genotype associated to a clinical picture of hypercalcemia, nephrolithiasis and low bone mass. Urolithiasis 45, 291–294 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00240-016-0923-4

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Keywords

  • Genetics
  • Vitamin D
  • Hypercalciuria
  • Osteoporosis
  • Urolithiasis