The impact of stack geometry and mean pressure on cold end temperature of stack in thermoacoustic refrigeration systems

Original
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

This paper reports on the experimental and simulation studies of the influence of stack geometries and different mean pressures on the cold end temperature of the stack in the thermoacoustic refrigeration system. The stack geometry was tested, including spiral stack, circular pore stack and pin array stack. The results of this study show that the mean pressure of the gas in the system has a significant impact on the cold end temperature of the stack. The mean pressure of the gas in the system corresponds to thermal penetration depth, which results in a better cold end temperature of the stack. The results also show that the cold end temperature of the pin array stack decreases more than that of the spiral stack and circular pore stack geometry by approximately 63% and 70%, respectively. In addition, the thermal area and viscous area of the stack are analyzed to explain the results of such temperatures of thermoacoustic stacks.

Abbreviations

a

Speed of sound (m s-1)

A

Cross-sectional area (m2)

Agas

Gas cross-sectional area (m2)

Atotal

Total cross-sectional area of stack (m2)

B

Blockage ratio

cp

Isobaric specific heat (J kg-1 K-1)

COP

Coefficient of performance

COPs

Coefficient of performance of the stack

D

Drive ratio

do

Diameter (m)

fk

Thermal Rott function

fv

Viscous Rott function

H

Enthalpy flux (W)

K

Thermal conductivity (W m-1 K-1)

Ls

Stack length (m)

Lsn

Normalized stack length

l

Half of stack plate thickness (m)

M

Mach number

Pm

Mean pressure (N m-2)

Po

Pressure amplitude (N m-2)

Qc

Cooling power (W)

R

Radius of pore (m)

rh

Hydraulic radius (m)

ri

Radius of pin (m)

Tc

Cold end temperature of the stack ( o C)

Th

Hot end temperature of the stack ( o C)

Tm

Mean temperature (K)

W

Work flux (W)

xs

Stack position (m)

xn

Normalized stack position

y0

Half of distance between the stack plates (m)

ΦH

Normalized enthalpy flux

ΦW

Normalized work flux

δk

Thermal penetration depth (m)

δkn

Normalized thermal penetration depth

δv

Viscous penetration depth (m)

ΔTmn

Normalized temperature difference

γ

Ratio of isobaric to isochoric specific heat

σ

Prandtl number

μ

Viscosity (kg m-1 s-1)

ρ

Density (kg m-3)

ω

Angular frequency (rad s-1)

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research project was financially supported by Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, Pathum Thani, Thailand.

References

  1. 1.
    Swift GW (1988) Thermoacoustic engines. J Acoust Soc Am 84(4):1145–1180.  https://doi.org/10.1121/1.396617 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Garrett SL, Adeff JA, Hofler TJ (1993) Thermoacoustic refrigerator for space applications. J Thermophys Heat Transf 7(4):595–599.  https://doi.org/10.2514/3.466 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Harris DA, Volkert RE (1989) Design and calibration of an electrodynamic driver for the Space Thermoacoustic Refrigerator (STAR). Master’s Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CaliforniaGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wetzel M, Herman C (1997) Design optimization of thermoacoustic refrigerators. Int J Refrig 20(1):3–21.  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-7007(96)00064-3 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tijani MEH, Zeegers JCH, de Waele ATAM (2002) Design of thermoacoustic refrigerators. Cryogenics 42(1):49–57.  https://doi.org/10.1016/s0011-2275(01)00179-5 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Zolpakar NA, Mohd-Ghazali N, Ahmad R (2016) Experimental investigations of the performance of a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator based on multi-objective genetic algorithm optimized parameters. Appl Therm Eng 100:296–303.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2016.02.028 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wantha C, Assawamartbunlue K (2013) Experimental investigation of the effects of driver housing and resonance tube on the temperature difference across a thermoacoustic stack. Heat Mass Transf 49(6):887–896.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00231-013-1150-y CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Piccolo A (2011) Numerical computation for parallel plate thermoacoustic heat exchangers in standing wave oscillatory flow. Int J Heat Mass Transf 54(21–22):4518–4530.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2011.06.027 CrossRefMATHGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Akhavanbazaz M, Siddiqui MHK, Bhat RB (2007) The impact of gas blockage on the performance of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Exp Thermal Fluid Sci 32(1):231–239.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2007.03.009 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Paek I, Braun JE, Mongeau L (2007) Evaluation of standing-wave thermoacoustic cycles for cooling applications. Int J Refrig 30(6):1059–1071.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrefrig.2006.12.014 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Tijani MEH, Zeegers JCH, de Waele ATAM (2002) The optimal stack spacing for thermoacoustic refrigeration. J Acoust Soc Am 112(1):128–133.  https://doi.org/10.1121/1.1487842 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Nsofor EC, Ali A (2009) Experimental study on the performance of the thermoacoustic refrigerating system. Appl Therm Eng 29(13):2672–2679.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2008.12.036 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Tasnim SH, Mahmud S, Fraser RA (2012) Effects of variation in working fluids and operating conditions on the performance of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Int Commun Heat Mass Transfer 39(6):762–768.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icheatmasstransfer.2012.04.013 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Arnott WP, Bass HE, Raspet R (1991) General formulation of thermoacoustics for stacks having arbitrarily shaped pore cross sections. J Acoust Soc Am 90(6):3228–3237.  https://doi.org/10.1121/1.401432 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Swift GW (2001) Thermoacoustics: a unifying perspective for some engines and refrigerators, vol Fifth draft. Fifth draft edn. Condensed matter and thermal physics group, Los Alamos National LaboratoryGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Holman J (2011) Experimental Methods for Engineers. McGraw-Hill Education, BostonGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Keolian RM, Swift GW (1995) Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion. 5456082, 10/10/1995Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Nessler FS (1994) Comparison of a pin stack to a conventional stack in a thermoacoustic prime mover. Master's Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CaliforniaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Energy Technology and Heat Transfer Enhancement Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringRajamangala University of Technology ThanyaburiThanyaburiThailand

Personalised recommendations