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Heat and Mass Transfer

, Volume 43, Issue 8, pp 817–825 | Cite as

Flow and heat transfer in a pipe with a fin attached to inner wall

  • Nureddin DinlerEmail author
  • Nuri Yucel
Original

Abstract

Enhancement of heat transfer to the fluid can be done by turbulence promoters such as attached fins to the pipe walls. In this study, the flow field and the heat transfer rates were numerically investigated in a pipe with an internally attached fin. Numerical simulations were conducted for four different types of fluids and for different fin heights and locations, and as the Reynolds number was varied, the effects of the fin on Nusselt number and friction factors were investigated. For all the Reynolds numbers considered in this study, the effect of fin location on the heat transfer rate and friction factor was negligible. As the fin height was increased, the mean Nusselt number and the friction factor also increased in the turbulent flow regimes. For low Prandtl number fluids (Pr = 0.011), the main heat transfer mode is conduction, and hence the mean Nusselt number slightly affected the flow rates.

Keywords

Reynolds Number Nusselt Number Prandtl Number Friction Factor Heat Transfer Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

List of symbols

D

diameter

h

fin height

hconv

convection heat transfer coefficient

k

turbulent kinetic energy

kcond

conduction heat transfer coefficient

kfluid

heat transfer coefficient of fluid

Lc

considered length of pipe

Lent

entrance length

Lex

exit length

Lf

fin location from z = 0

Pr

Prandtl number

r+

dimensionless distance

Δrp

nearest grid point distance to wall

R

radius of pipe

Re

Reynolds number

T

temperature

T+

dimensionless temperature

Tbulk

bulk temperature

Tw

wall temperature

T0

inlet temperature

ur

r velocity component

uz

z velocity component

U0

inlet velocity

Greek symbols

ε

turbulent kinetic energy dissipation

μ

viscosity

μeff

effective viscosity

μt

turbulent viscosity

ρ

density

σn,t

turbulent Prandtl number

τw

wall shear stress

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and ArchitectureGazi UniversityAnkaraTurkey

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