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Marine Biology

, Volume 136, Issue 6, pp 1087–1098 | Cite as

Blood oxygen-binding characteristics of bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), a high-energy-demand teleost that is tolerant of low ambient oxygen

  • T. E. Lowe
  • R. W. Brill
  • K. L. Cousins

Abstract

 We found blood from bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) to have a significantly higher O2 affinity than blood from other tunas. Its P50 (partial pressure of oxygen, PO2 required to reach 50% saturation) was 1.6 to 2.0 kPa (12 to 15 mmHg) when equilibrated with 0.5% CO2. Previous studies employing similar methodologies found blood from yellowfin tuna (T. albacares), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), and kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis) to have a P50 of 2.8 to 3.1 kPa (21 to 23 mmHg). These observations suggest that bigeye tuna are more tolerant of low ambient oxygen than other tuna species, and support similar conclusions derived from laboratory whole-animal studies, depth-of-capture data, and directly-recorded vertical movements of fish in the open ocean. We also found the O2 affinity of bigeye tuna blood to be essentially unaffected by a 10 C° open-system temperature change (as is the blood of all tuna species studied to date). The O2 affinity of bigeye tuna blood was, however, more affected by a 10 C° closed-system temperature change than the blood of any tuna species yet examined. In other words, bigeye tuna blood displayed a significantly enhanced Bohr effect (change in log P50 per unit change in plasma pH at P50) when subjected to the inevitable changes in partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) and plasma pH that accompany closed-system temperature shifts, than when subjected to changes in plasma pH accomplished by changing PCO2 alone. In vivo, the resultant large decrease in O2 affinity (i.e. the increase in P50) that occurs as the blood of bigeye tuna is warmed during its passage through the vascular counter-current heat exchangers ensures adequate rates of O2 off-loading in the swimming muscles of this high-energy-demand teleost.

Keywords

Partial Pressure Heat Exchanger Open Ocean Adequate Rate Yellowfin Tuna 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. E. Lowe
    • 1
  • R. W. Brill
    • 1
  • K. L. Cousins
    • 1
  1. 1.Pelagic Fisheries Research Program, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USAUS

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