Marine Biology

, Volume 162, Issue 8, pp 1625–1635

Thermogeographic variation in body size of Carcinus maenas, the European green crab

  • Amanda L. Kelley
  • Catherine E. de Rivera
  • Edwin D. Grosholz
  • Gregory M. Ruiz
  • Sylvia Behrens Yamada
  • Graham Gillespie
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-015-2698-5

Cite this article as:
Kelley, A.L., de Rivera, C.E., Grosholz, E.D. et al. Mar Biol (2015) 162: 1625. doi:10.1007/s00227-015-2698-5

Abstract

Populations that span a large geographic range often experience a thermal gradient that can differentially affect the phenotypic response of individuals across the population. Variation in temperature has been shown to affect the final adult size of ectotherms, which is referred to as the temperature–size rule for ectotherms. Body size is a fundamentally important trait, as it can impact physiological performance, fecundity, longevity, and macroecological patterns. Hence, temperature may affect body size across a range, which can in turn influence maintenance of populations and ecological interactions. Here, we test whether biogeographic differences in size (carapace width) exist for a recent invasion of the non-native European green crab, Carcinus maenas, along the west coast of North America. We assembled trapping and temperature data collected from 10 sites along the western North American coast over a 5-year period. We also conducted a literature review of C. maenas size across their native range. Our results indicate that adult body size shows negative correlation with environmental temperature in both the native and invaded ranges, conforming to the temperature–size rule for ectotherms. Given the short time since colonization and lack of evident genetic structure across the invasive range, it may be that phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental temperature is driving this relationship. Forces that shape the phenotypic trajectory of species may play an important role in both invasion dynamics and subsequent ecological impacts.

Supplementary material

227_2015_2698_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (6 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 6 kb)
227_2015_2698_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (159 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 158 kb)
227_2015_2698_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (296 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (PDF 295 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Science Foundation
  • 220005
UC Exotic Pest and Disease Program
    UC Exotic Pest and Disease Program
      Oceans and Fisheries, Canada
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
        • NA06OAR4170261
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
        • NA06OAR4170159
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
        • NA07OAR4170501
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
        • NA08OAR4170927
        Alaska Department of Fish and Game
        • IHP-07-146

        Copyright information

        © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

        Authors and Affiliations

        • Amanda L. Kelley
          • 1
        • Catherine E. de Rivera
          • 2
        • Edwin D. Grosholz
          • 3
        • Gregory M. Ruiz
          • 2
          • 4
        • Sylvia Behrens Yamada
          • 5
        • Graham Gillespie
          • 6
        1. 1.Department of Ecology Evolution and Marine BiologyUniversity of California Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA
        2. 2.Department of Environmental Science and ManagementPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
        3. 3.Department of Environmental Science and PolicyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
        4. 4.Smithsonian Environmental Research CenterEdgewaterUSA
        5. 5.Integrative BiologyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
        6. 6.Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Science BranchPacific Region Pacific Biological StationNanaimoCanada

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