Marine Biology

, Volume 160, Issue 1, pp 97–105

Temporal and spatial variability in coral recruitment on two Indonesian coral reefs: consistently lower recruitment to a degraded reef

  • P. Salinas-de-León
  • C. Dryden
  • D. J. Smith
  • J. J. Bell
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-012-2066-7

Cite this article as:
Salinas-de-León, P., Dryden, C., Smith, D.J. et al. Mar Biol (2013) 160: 97. doi:10.1007/s00227-012-2066-7

Abstract

Corals are the primary reef-building organisms, therefore it is key to understand their recruitment patterns for effective reef management. Coral recruitment rates and juvenile coral abundance were recorded in the Wakatobi National Marine Park, Indonesia, on two reefs (Sampela and Hoga) with different levels of environmental degradation (12.5 vs. 44 % coral cover with high and low sedimentation rates, respectively) to examine consistencies in recruitment patterns between years and seasons. Recruitment was measured on multiple panels at two sites on each reef (6–7 m depth) and cleared areas of natural reef. Although coral recruitment was twofold higher in 2008–2009 than in 2007–2008, and seasonal differences were identified, consistent significant differences in recruitment rates were found between the two reefs even though they are separated by only ~1.5 km. Recruitment rates and juvenile abundance were lower on the more degraded reef. These patterns are likely a consequence of differential pre- and post-settlement mortality as a result of the high sedimentation rates and degraded conditions and possibly reduced larval supply.

Supplementary material

227_2012_2066_MOESM1_ESM.eps (6.8 mb)
ESM 1. Diagram of recruitment panel setup. A) Recruitment panel prior deployment. Panels were composed of two terracotta tiles (20 × 10 cm) cable tied to a plank of hardwood (30 × 10 cm). B) Recruitment panel after deployment (top view). Panels were attached to vertical surfaces on the reef using two galvanised nails. A small piece of hardwood (2 × 2 × 2 cm) was placed between each panel and the reef to leave a 2-cm gap. (EPS 6947 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Salinas-de-León
    • 1
  • C. Dryden
    • 2
  • D. J. Smith
    • 3
  • J. J. Bell
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Marine Environmental and Economic Research, School of Biological SciencesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  2. 2.School of Marine Science and TechnologyNewcastle UniversityNewcastle Upon TyneUK
  3. 3.Coral Reef Research Unit, Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of EssexColchesterUK

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