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Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 103, Issue 3, pp 246–251 | Cite as

Association of Plasma Irisin with Bone Mineral Density in a Large Chinese Population Using an Extreme Sampling Design

  • Long-Fei Wu
  • Dong-Cheng Zhu
  • Chang-Hua Tang
  • Bing Ge
  • Ju Shi
  • Bing-Hua Wang
  • Yi-Hua Lu
  • Pei He
  • Wen-Yu Wang
  • Si-Qi Lu
  • Jiao Zhong
  • Xu Zhou
  • Kan Zhu
  • Wen Ji
  • Hong-Qin Gao
  • Hong-Bo Gu
  • Xing-Bo Mo
  • Xin Lu
  • Lei Zhang
  • Yong-Hong Zhang
  • Fei-Yan Deng
  • Shu-Feng Lei
Original Research
  • 161 Downloads

Abstract

Irisin, a myokine produced by skeletal muscle in response to physical exercise, promotes trans-differentiation of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. Recent evidences suggested that irisin also plays an important role in the control of bone metabolism. This study aimed to ascertain the relationship between plasma irisin and bone mineral density (BMD) in Chinese population by adoption of an extreme sampling method. Based on a large and screened Chinese elderly population (N = 6308), two subgroups with extremely high and low hip BMD were selected for discovery (N = 80, high vs. low BMD = 44:36) and validation (N = 60, high vs. low BMD = 30:30), respectively. Plasma irisin, P1NP, and β-CTx were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. Other metabolic parameters (e.g., blood glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides) were collected. Student’s t test and Spearman correlation analyses were conducted in SPSS. Significant difference was discovered for plasma irisin between females and age-matched males (N = 80, male vs. female = 42:38, P = 0.002). The plasma irisin levels were significantly higher in high BMD subjects than in low BMD subjects, which was observed in both discovery (P = 0.012) and validation samples (P = 0.022). However, such observation was limited to males only. Further correlation analyses in males showed that plasma irisin was correlated with BMD (r = 0.362, P = 0.025) and triglyceride (r = − 0.354, P = 0.032). Plasma irisin levels were associated with hip BMD in Chinese elderly men. This study represented the first effort of investigating the relationship of plasma irisin and BMD in elderly population. The positive correlation between plasma irisin and BMD hints intrinsic communication between muscle and bone.

Keywords

Irisin BMD Osteoporosis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The study was supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (81502868, 81373010, 81541068, 81473046, 31271336, 31401079, and 81401343), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (BK20130300, BK20150346), the Natural Science Research Project of Jiangsu Provincial Higher Education (16KJA330001), the Startup Fund from Soochow University (Q413900112, Q413900712), and a Project of the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.

Author Contributions

LFW, DCZ, DFY, and SFL conceived and coordinated the study and wrote the paper. LFW, YHL, and BHW performed and analyzed the experiments. DCZ, CHT, BG, JS, PH, WYW, SQL, JZ, XZ, KZ, WJ, HQG, HBG, XL, LZ, and YHZ provided technical assistance and contributed to the preparation of sample. All authors reviewed the results and approved the final version of the manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Long-Fei Wu, Dong-Cheng Zhu, Chang-Hua Tang, Bing Ge, Ju Shi, Bing-Hua Wang, Yi-Hua Lu, Pei He, Wen-Yu Wang, Si-Qi Lu, Jiao Zhong, Xu Zhou, Kan Zhu, Wen Ji, Hong-Qin Gao, Hong-Bo Gu, Xing-Bo Mo, Xin Lu, Lei Zhang, Yong-Hong Zhang, Fei-Yan Deng, and Shu-Feng Lei declare no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

The study was approved by Institutional Research Ethic Board at the Soochow University. All the participants provided written informed-consent documents before entering the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Long-Fei Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dong-Cheng Zhu
    • 3
  • Chang-Hua Tang
    • 3
  • Bing Ge
    • 3
  • Ju Shi
    • 3
  • Bing-Hua Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yi-Hua Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pei He
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wen-Yu Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Si-Qi Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiao Zhong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xu Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kan Zhu
    • 4
  • Wen Ji
    • 5
  • Hong-Qin Gao
    • 6
  • Hong-Bo Gu
    • 6
  • Xing-Bo Mo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lei Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong-Hong Zhang
    • 2
  • Fei-Yan Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shu-Feng Lei
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  1. 1.Center for Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics, School of Public HealthMedical College of Soochow UniversitySuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric DiseasesSoochow UniversitySuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of OrthopedicsSihong People’s HospitalSuqianPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Loujiang Community Health Service CenterSuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Disease Prevention and Control Center of Suzhou high Tech ZoneSuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.Shishan Community Health Service Center, Suzhou High Tech ZoneSuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  7. 7.Center for Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics, School of Public HealthSoochow UniversitySuzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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