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Motion control, motion sickness, and the postural dynamics of mobile devices

Abstract

Drivers are less likely than passengers to experience motion sickness, an effect that is important for any theoretical account of motion sickness etiology. We asked whether different types of control would affect the incidence of motion sickness, and whether any such effects would be related to participants’ control of their own bodies. Participants played a video game on a tablet computer. In the Touch condition, the device was stationary and participants controlled the game exclusively through fingertip inputs via the device’s touch screen. In the Tilt condition, participants held the device in their hands and moved the device to control some game functions. Results revealed that the incidence of motion sickness was greater in the Touch condition than in the Tilt condition. During game play, movement of the head and torso differed as a function of the type of game control. Before the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness, movement of the head and torso differed between participants who later reported motion sickness and those that did not. We discuss implications of these results for theories of motion sickness etiology.

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Correspondence to Thomas A. Stoffregen.

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Stoffregen, T.A., Chen, YC. & Koslucher, F.C. Motion control, motion sickness, and the postural dynamics of mobile devices. Exp Brain Res 232, 1389–1397 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-014-3859-3

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Keywords

  • Posture
  • Postural control
  • Motion sickness
  • Human–computer interaction