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Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 195, Issue 3, pp 473–479 | Cite as

Differential effects of delay upon visually and haptically guided grasping and perceptual judgments

  • Charles E. PettypieceEmail author
  • Jody C. Culham
  • Melvyn A. Goodale
Research Note

Abstract

Experiments with visual illusions have revealed a dissociation between the systems that mediate object perception and those responsible for object-directed action. More recently, an experiment on a haptic version of the visual size–contrast illusion has provided evidence for the notion that the haptic modality shows a similar dissociation when grasping and estimating the size of objects in real-time. Here we present evidence suggesting that the similarities between the two modalities begin to break down once a delay is introduced between when people feel the target object and when they perform the grasp or estimation. In particular, when grasping after a delay in a haptic paradigm, people scale their grasps differently when the target is presented with a flanking object of a different size (although the difference does not reflect a size–contrast effect). When estimating after a delay, however, it appears that people ignore the size of the flanking objects entirely. This does not fit well with the results commonly found in visual experiments. Thus, introducing a delay reveals important differences in the way in which haptic and visual memories are stored and accessed.

Keywords

Vision Haptics Memory Illusions Grasping Estimation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to Dr. Jody Culham (#249877-2006 RGPIN).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles E. Pettypiece
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jody C. Culham
    • 1
  • Melvyn A. Goodale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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