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Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 407, Issue 11, pp 2945–2954 | Cite as

Development of urine standard reference materials for metabolites of organic chemicals including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, phenols, parabens, and volatile organic compounds

  • Michele M. SchantzEmail author
  • Bruce A. BennerJr.
  • N. Alan Heckert
  • Lane C. Sander
  • Katherine E. Sharpless
  • Stacy S. Vander Pol
  • Y. Vasquez
  • M. Villegas
  • Stephen A. Wise
  • K. Udeni Alwis
  • Benjamin C. Blount
  • Antonia M. Calafat
  • Zheng Li
  • Manori J. Silva
  • Xiaoyun Ye
  • Éric Gaudreau
  • Donald G. PattersonJr
  • Andreas Sjödin
Paper in Forefront
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Reference Materials for Chemical Analysis

Abstract

Two new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs), SRM 3672 Organic Contaminants in Smokers’ Urine (Frozen) and SRM 3673 Organic Contaminants in Non-Smokers’ Urine (Frozen), have been developed in support of studies for assessment of human exposure to select organic environmental contaminants. Collaborations among three organizations resulted in certified values for 11 hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) and reference values for 11 phthalate metabolites, 8 environmental phenols and parabens, and 24 volatile organic compound (VOC) metabolites. Reference values are also available for creatinine and the free forms of caffeine, theobromine, ibuprofen, nicotine, cotinine, and 3-hydroxycotinine. These are the first urine Certified Reference Materials characterized for metabolites of organic environmental contaminants. Noteworthy, the mass fractions of the environmental organic contaminants in the two SRMs are within the ranges reported in population survey studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). These SRMs will be useful as quality control samples for ensuring compatibility of results among population survey studies and will fill a void to assess the accuracy of analytical methods used in studies monitoring human exposure to these organic environmental contaminants.

Graphical Abstract

Metabolites of PAHs, Phthalates, Phenols, Parabens, and VOCs in Urine SRMs

Keywords

Reference materials Urine PAHs Phthalates Phenols VOCs 

Notes

Disclaimer

Certain commercial equipment, instruments, or materials are identified in this paper to specify adequately the experimental procedure. Such identification does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, nor does it imply that the materials or equipment identified are necessarily the best available for the purpose. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Supplementary material

216_2014_8441_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (14 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 13 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (outside the USA) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele M. Schantz
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bruce A. BennerJr.
    • 1
  • N. Alan Heckert
    • 2
  • Lane C. Sander
    • 1
  • Katherine E. Sharpless
    • 1
  • Stacy S. Vander Pol
    • 1
  • Y. Vasquez
    • 1
    • 6
  • M. Villegas
    • 1
    • 6
  • Stephen A. Wise
    • 1
  • K. Udeni Alwis
    • 3
  • Benjamin C. Blount
    • 3
  • Antonia M. Calafat
    • 3
  • Zheng Li
    • 3
  • Manori J. Silva
    • 3
  • Xiaoyun Ye
    • 3
  • Éric Gaudreau
    • 4
  • Donald G. PattersonJr
    • 5
  • Andreas Sjödin
    • 3
  1. 1.Chemical Sciences DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.Statistical Engineering DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyCharlestonUSA
  3. 3.National Center for Environmental HealthCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Toxicology LaboratoryInstitut National de Santé Publique du QuébecQuébecCanada
  5. 5.Environ Solutions Consulting, Inc.AuburnUSA
  6. 6.Centro de Metrologia QuimicaSantiagoChile

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