Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 402, Issue 2, pp 749–762 | Cite as

Preparation and value assignment of standard reference material 968e fat-soluble vitamins, carotenoids, and cholesterol in human serum

  • Jeanice B. Thomas
  • David L. Duewer
  • Isaac O. Mugenya
  • Karen W. Phinney
  • Lane C. Sander
  • Katherine E. Sharpless
  • Lorna T. Sniegoski
  • Susan S. Tai
  • Michael J. Welch
  • James H. Yen
Original Paper

Abstract

Standard Reference Material 968e Fat-Soluble Vitamins, Carotenoids, and Cholesterol in Human Serum provides certified values for total retinol, γ- and α-tocopherol, total lutein, total zeaxanthin, total β-cryptoxanthin, total β-carotene, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and cholesterol. Reference and information values are also reported for nine additional compounds including total α-cryptoxanthin, trans- and total lycopene, total α-carotene, trans-β-carotene, and coenzyme Q10. The certified values for the fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids in SRM 968e were based on the agreement of results from the means of two liquid chromatographic methods used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and from the median of results of an interlaboratory comparison exercise among institutions that participate in the NIST Micronutrients Measurement Quality Assurance Program. The assigned values for cholesterol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in the SRM are the means of results obtained using the NIST reference method based upon gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. SRM 968e is currently one of two available health-related NIST reference materials with concentration values assigned for selected fat-soluble vitamins, carotenoids, and cholesterol in human serum matrix. This SRM is used extensively by laboratories worldwide primarily to validate methods for determining these analytes in human serum and plasma and for assigning values to in-house control materials. The value assignment of the analytes in this SRM will help support measurement accuracy and traceability for laboratories performing health-related measurements in the clinical and nutritional communities.

Keywords

Standard reference material Fat-soluble vitamins Carotenoids Frozen human serum Cholesterol Value assignment 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag (outside the USA) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanice B. Thomas
    • 1
  • David L. Duewer
    • 1
  • Isaac O. Mugenya
    • 3
  • Karen W. Phinney
    • 1
  • Lane C. Sander
    • 1
  • Katherine E. Sharpless
    • 1
  • Lorna T. Sniegoski
    • 1
  • Susan S. Tai
    • 1
  • Michael J. Welch
    • 1
  • James H. Yen
    • 2
  1. 1.Analytical Chemistry DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.Statistical Engineering DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  3. 3.Testing Services Department, Food and Agriculture LaboratoriesKenya Bureau of StandardsNairobiKenya

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