Skip to main content

Effect of combined doses of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol or tetrahydrocannabinolic acid and cannabidiolic acid on acute nausea in male Sprague-Dawley rats

Abstract

Rationale

This study evaluated the potential of combined cannabis constituents to reduce nausea.

Objectives

Using the lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping model of nausea in male rats, we aimed to:

1) Determine effective anti-nausea doses of cannabidiol (CBD)

2) Determine effectiveness and the mechanism of action of combined subthreshold doses of CBD and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

3) Determine effective doses of synthetic cannabidiolic acid (CBDA)

4) Determine effective doses of synthetic tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)

5) Determine the mechanism of action for THCA

6) Determine effectiveness and the mechanism of action of combined subthreshold doses of CBDA and THCA

Results

CBD (0.5–5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) reduces LiCl-induced conditioned gaping (but 0.1, 20, 40 mg/kg are ineffective). Combined subthreshold doses of CBD (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and THC (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) produce suppression of conditioned gaping, and this effect is blocked by administration of either WAY100635 (a serotonin 1A [5-HT1A]) receptor antagonist or SR141716 (SR; a CB1 receptor antagonist). THCA (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) reduces conditioned gaping and administration of MK886 (a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha [PPARα] antagonist) blocked THCA’s anti-nausea effect. Combined subthreshold doses of CBDA (0.00001 mg/kg, i.p.) and THCA (0.001 mg/kg, i.p.) produce suppression of conditioned gaping, and this effect is blocked by administration of WAY100635 or MK886.

Conclusion

Combinations of very low doses of CBD + THC or CBDA + THCA robustly reduce LiCl-induced conditioned gaping. Clinical trials are necessary to determine the efficacy of using single or combined cannabinoids as adjunct treatments with existing anti-emetic regimens to manage chemotherapy-induced nausea.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
Fig. 6

Abbreviations

5-HT1A :

Serotonin 1A

ANOVA:

Analysis of variance

CB1 :

Cannabinoid 1

CBD:

Cannabidiol

CBDA:

Cannabidiolic acid

i.p.:

Intraperitoneal

CTA:

Conditioned taste avoidance

FAAH:

Fatty acid amide hydrolase

LiCl:

Lithium chloride

OEA:

N-oleoylethanolamide

PEA:

N- palmitoylethanolamide

PPARα:

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

SAL:

Saline

SR:

SR141716

THC:

Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol

THCA:

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid

TR:

Taste reactivity

VEH:

Vehicle

WAY:

WAY100635

References

Download references

Funding

The research described here was funded by research grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC: 03629), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR:388239) and an NSERC Engage grant (NSERC EGP 531553-18).

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Linda A. Parker.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Additional information

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Rock, E.M., Sullivan, M.T., Pravato, S. et al. Effect of combined doses of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol or tetrahydrocannabinolic acid and cannabidiolic acid on acute nausea in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Psychopharmacology 237, 901–914 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-019-05428-4

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-019-05428-4

Keywords

  • Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol
  • Cannabidiol
  • Cannabidiolic acid
  • Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid
  • Conditioned gaping
  • 5-HT1A
  • PPARα
  • CB1