Psychopharmacology

, 208:37 | Cite as

Rimonabant (SR141716) has no effect on alcohol self-administration or endocrine measures in nontreatment-seeking heavy alcohol drinkers

  • David Ted George
  • David W. Herion
  • Cheryl L. Jones
  • Monte J. Phillips
  • Jacqueline Hersh
  • Debra Hill
  • Markus Heilig
  • Vijay A. Ramchandani
  • Christopher Geyer
  • David E. Spero
  • Erick D. Singley
  • Stephanie S. O’Malley
  • Raafat Bishai
  • Robert R. Rawlings
  • George Kunos
Original Investigation

Abstract

Rationale

There is an extensive literature showing that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) decreases alcohol consumption in animals, but little is known about its effects in human alcohol drinkers.

Methods

In this study, 49 nontreatment-seeking heavy alcohol drinkers participated in a 3-week study. After a 1-week baseline, participants received either 20 mg/day of rimonabant or placebo for 2 weeks under double-blind conditions. During these 3 weeks, participants reported their daily alcohol consumption by telephone. Subsequently, they participated in an alcohol self-administration paradigm in which they received a priming dose of alcohol followed by the option of consuming either eight alcohol drinks or receiving $3.00 for each nonconsumed drink. Endocrine measures and self-rating scales were also obtained.

Results

Rimonabant did not change alcohol consumption during the 2 weeks of daily call-ins. Similarly, the drug did not change either alcohol self-administration or endocrine measures during the laboratory session.

Conclusion

We conclude that the daily administration of 20 mg of rimonabant for 2 weeks has no effect on alcohol consumption in nontreatment-seeking heavy alcohol drinkers.

Keywords

Rimonabant (SR141716) Alcohol Heavy drinkers CB1 receptor antagonist Alcohol self-administration Endocannabinoids 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Ted George
    • 1
  • David W. Herion
    • 1
  • Cheryl L. Jones
    • 1
  • Monte J. Phillips
    • 1
  • Jacqueline Hersh
    • 1
  • Debra Hill
    • 1
  • Markus Heilig
    • 1
  • Vijay A. Ramchandani
    • 1
  • Christopher Geyer
    • 2
  • David E. Spero
    • 2
  • Erick D. Singley
    • 1
  • Stephanie S. O’Malley
    • 3
  • Raafat Bishai
    • 4
  • Robert R. Rawlings
    • 1
  • George Kunos
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Laboratory of Clinical and Translational StudiesNational Institute on Alcohol Abuse and AlcoholismBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Center NursingNIHBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.School of MedicineYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.International Clinical DevelopmentSanofi-AventisMalvernUSA
  5. 5.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and AlcoholismBethesdaUSA
  6. 6.NIAAARockvilleUSA

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