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Osteoporosis International

, Volume 28, Issue 8, pp 2309–2318 | Cite as

Meta-analysis of hypertension and osteoporotic fracture risk in women and men

  • C. Li
  • Y. Zeng
  • L. Tao
  • S. Liu
  • Z. Ni
  • Q. Huang
  • Q. WangEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Summary

The present meta-analysis synthesized evidence from 10 articles encompassing 28 independent studies to verify the association between hypertension and osteoporotic fracture risk in women and men. Our results indicate that the risk of osteoporotic fracture among individuals with hypertension was higher than that among individuals without hypertension.

Introduction

Epidemiological studies have suggested that hypertension is related to osteoporotic fracture. However, discrepancies exist in the reported findings. In this study, a systematic review of relevant published articles was conducted to verify the association between hypertension and osteoporotic fracture risk in women and men.

Methods

PubMed (1953_October 5th, 2016) and Embase (1974_October 5th, 2016) were systematically searched for relevant articles. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were derived using random effect models. Categorical, subgroup, heterogeneity, publication bias, and meta-regression analyses were conducted.

Results

We analyzed 10 articles encompassing 28 independent studies, 1,430,431 participants, and 148,048 osteoporotic fracture cases. The risk of osteoporotic fracture among individuals with hypertension was higher (pooled OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.25–1.40; I 2 = 72.3%, P < 0.001) than that among individuals without hypertension. The association between hypertension and fracture risk was slightly stronger in women (pooled OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.30–1.79) than in men (pooled OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.26–1.44). Studies conducted in Asia revealed results that were consistent with those of studies performed in Europe.

Conclusions

Hypertension is associated with osteoporotic fracture risk. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the effect of hypertension on osteoporotic fracture remain to be elucidated.

Keywords

Hypertension Meta-analysis Osteoporotic fracture 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81573235), Health and Family Commission of Wuhan Municipality (Grant No. WG15D20), and Wuhan Jiang’an District Science and Technology Bureau (Grant No. 2014111904).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Li
    • 1
  • Y. Zeng
    • 1
  • L. Tao
    • 1
  • S. Liu
    • 2
  • Z. Ni
    • 3
  • Q. Huang
    • 4
  • Q. Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Hospital Infection Management OfficePUAI HospitalWuhanChina
  3. 3.Women and Children Medical Center of Jiang-an DistrictWuhanChina
  4. 4.Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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