Increasing age- and sex-specific rates of hip fracture in Mexico: a survey of the Mexican institute of social security

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Abstract

Summary

This study, characterising the incidence of hip fracture in Mexico, showed that age- and sex-specific rates increased between 2000 and 2006. The demographic changes estimated for Mexico indicate that the annual number of hip fractures will rise from 29,732 in 2005 to 155,874 in 2050. If the age-specific incidence of hip fracture continues, the number of hip fractures would increase by a further 46%.

Introduction

The aim of the present study was to determine time trends, if any, in hip fracture rates for Mexico and to forecast the number of hip fractures expected in Mexico over the coming years up to 2050.

Methods

All hip fracture cases registered during the years 2000–2006 were collected at all the second and tertiary-care hospitals across the country from one of the largest health systems in Mexico, The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS).

Results

Between the years 2000 and 2006, the age-specific incidence of hip fracture increased significantly both for men and women by 1% per year (p = 0.016 and p < 0.001, respectively). In 2005, there were there were 29,732 hip fractures estimated in Mexico, 68% of which were found in women. Assuming no change in the age- and sex-specific incidence of hip fracture, the number of hip fractures was expected to increase markedly with time to 155,874 in 2050. Assuming that the age-specific incidence continues, the number of hip fractures in men and women would increase by a further 46% to 226,886 in 2050.

Conclusion

Demographic changes estimated for Mexico indicate that the annual number of hip fractures will rise from 29,732 in 2005 to 155,874 expected in 2050. If the age-specific incidence of hip fracture continues to rise, the number of hip fractures would increase by a further 46%.

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Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge Dr. José Luis Vasquez Martínez and Dr. María Guadalupe Mercadillo Pérez from the Division de Informática en Salud (Division of Informatics in Health) and the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social IMSS for their help.

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Correspondence to J. A. Kanis.

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Johansson, H., Clark, P., Carlos, F. et al. Increasing age- and sex-specific rates of hip fracture in Mexico: a survey of the Mexican institute of social security. Osteoporos Int 22, 2359–2364 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-010-1475-z

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Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Hip fractures
  • Mexico
  • Population projections
  • Secular trend